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Re: [For review] Scenarios page in How People with Disabilities Use the Web

From: Shadi Abou-Zahra <shadi@w3.org>
Date: Wed, 03 Mar 2010 10:27:12 +0100
Message-ID: <4B8E2B70.6050903@w3.org>
To: Anne McGrath <Anne.McGrath@mediaaccess.org.au>
CC: EOWG <w3c-wai-eo@w3.org>, WAI-AGE TF <public-wai-age@w3.org>
Hi Anne,

Thank you for your comments, we will discuss them in the next calls.

While you raise important points, I'm not sure if the advocacy aspects 
are the primary focus of this resource. In fact, also "Scenario 8: 
Teenager with deaf-blindness" relates to advocacy. It links to the 
"Contacting Organizations about Inaccessible Websites" document which 
should be the main reference for this type of advice.

Maybe we should reuse the same approach for scenario 3 too?

Regards,
   Shadi


Anne McGrath wrote:
> Hi from Anne McGrath: Media Access Australia - firstly apologies for my long absence from this forum.
> 
> 
> 
> I had the following thoughts:
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> Are the types of disabilities, browsing methods, and accessibility provisions outlined in the scenarios sufficiently illustrative?
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> Scenario 3 is particularly illustrative of a scenario faced by students with hearing impairment at university but finding the 'access solution' appears to come only after intervention of an advocacy group. It shows how the aid of a disability services organisation helped her work through the process for highlighting the oversight to providing accessible measures at university. The positive outcome can be seen to have worked out in this situation but the question arises: would the same outcome have been reached if there was not the support of a disability advocacy service? Perhaps it would be more effective to also highlight the potential negative implications in such a scenario. We feel this would put further impetus on universities to ensure accessibility options are not 'after the fact' but become standard across all online content. Also face to face lectures would be best delivered via real time captioning to meet the needs of hearing impaired students who do not use si
gn language as a means of communication. The majority of deaf and hearing impaired students are oral.
> 
> 
> 
> We feel another situation here with reference to educational content for the average school student needs to be included. This is necessary to target captioning of online streams of educational video clips and encourage producers of educational online material directly. Schools are already strapped for money and there are little resources available for captioning own material. Encouraging captioning of audio-files in the production process through the W3C's recommendations has the potential to significantly 'filter down' to producers of audio visual content  to embrace captioning and ensure that the breadth of online audio visual materials are inclusive.
> 
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> Is each scenario informative for web developers, yet equally easy to follow for any other reader who is new to web accessibility?
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> Yes.
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> Is the cross-linking to other pages in this resource sufficiently clear and easy to understand? (Note: not all the links work yet)
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> Yes.
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> Cheers,
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> 
> 
> Anne
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> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: w3c-wai-eo-request@w3.org [mailto:w3c-wai-eo-request@w3.org] On Behalf Of Shadi Abou-Zahra
> Sent: Tuesday, 2 March 2010 12:06 AM
> To: EOWG; WAI-AGE TF
> Subject: [For review] Scenarios page in How People with Disabilities Use the Web
> 
> 
> 
> Hello,
> 
> 
> 
> Ref: <http://www.w3.org/WAI/EO/Drafts/PWD-Use-Web/2009/scenarios>
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> 
> 
> The "Scenarios" page of "How People with Disabilities Use the Web" has
> 
> been updated and is ready for your review. Please focus on these types
> 
> of questions for this round of reviewing:
> 
> 
> 
> - are the types of disabilities, browsing methods, and accessibility
> 
> provisions outlined in the scenarios sufficiently illustrative?
> 
> 
> 
> - is each scenario informative for web developers, yet equally easy to
> 
> follow for any other reader who is new to web accessibility?
> 
> 
> 
> - is the cross-linking to other pages in this resource sufficiently
> 
> clear and easy to understand? (note: not all the links work yet)
> 
> 
> 
> Note: the initial version of each scenario is linked from the bottom of
> 
> each scenario, in case you want to compare back with previous work. You
> 
> can also find a version with notes and suggestions from the WAI-AGE TF:
> 
>   - <http://www.w3.org/WAI/EO/Drafts/PWD-Use-Web/2009/Overview-bak>
> 
> 
> 
> Reminder: feel free to send comments and suggestions that you want to
> 
> discuss to the EOWG and WAI-AGE TF mailing lists:
> 
>   - WAI-AGE TF <public-wai-age@w3.org>
> 
>   - EOWG <w3c-wai-eo@w3.org>
> 
> 
> 
> Minor editorial comments that don't need discussion can be sent to:
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>   - EOWG Editors <wai-eo-editors@w3.org>
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> 
> 
> Looking forward to further discussion on this resource.
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> 
> 
> 
> 
> Best,
> 
>    Shadi
> 
> 
> 
> --
> 
> Shadi Abou-Zahra - http://www.w3.org/People/shadi/ |
> 
>    WAI International Program Office Activity Lead   |
> 
>   W3C Evaluation & Repair Tools Working Group Chair |
> 
> 
> 

-- 
Shadi Abou-Zahra - http://www.w3.org/People/shadi/ |
   WAI International Program Office Activity Lead   |
  W3C Evaluation & Repair Tools Working Group Chair |
Received on Wednesday, 3 March 2010 09:27:40 UTC

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