W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > w3c-wai-eo@w3.org > April to June 2004

Re: Web site questions: #1

From: Chuck Letourneau <cpl@starlingweb.com>
Date: Thu, 29 Apr 2004 17:44:21 -0400
Message-Id: <6.0.3.0.2.20040429173425.021ee3e8@host.igs.net>
To: "Shawn Lawton Henry" <shawn@w3.org>
Cc: w3c-wai-eo@w3.org
At 2004-04-29 13:47, you wrote:

>1. WAI site "purpose"
>
>WSTF recommends a short bit of text in a prominent top position of the
>WAI home page that:
>- answers the question, "What can I get from this site?"
>- is user-centric (that is, from the user's point of view, not WAI's
>point of view)
>- is focused for people who are new to the site, answering "What is this
>page/site I've landed on?"
>- has some pizzazz
>- generally aligns with the vision of the Web site
>- is very short, preferably around 30 words or less
>
>A "straw proposal":
>WAI provides guidelines and resources to make the Web accessible to
>people with disabilities. WAI is an international collaborative forum to
>help Web content providers, Web software developers, business and policy
>leaders, and others create an accessible Web.
>
>(Thanks to Carol, Charmane, Blossom, Judy, and Shawn for contributing
>ideas for the straw proposal. Other ideas are in the WSTF e-mail list
>archive:
>             http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-wai-eo-site/2004Apr/
>)
>
>Question: Ideas for what the text would be.
>

The straw proposal above doesn't really roll off my tongue.  It seems kind 
of stiff and formal (especially if we are looking for "pizzazz").  Most of 
the other suggestions I found on the list (clipped below) use "accessible" 
or "accessibility" a lot. Only Shawn's two suggestions manage to use it 
only once (twice if you expand the A in WAI).

I kind of like Carol's first sentence: "WAI is your resource for Web 
accessibility." (Charmane's plug for it being the "primary" resource is 
perhaps too bold... I agree it should be, but can we be 100% certain it 
is/will be?)  Once the site is redesigned and effective it may be "Your 
BEST resource" <grin>.

Sadly, I can't seem to craft a pizzazzy alternative myself so for the 
moment I guess I favour Shawn's second suggestion (the one with the linked 
bullets).  She tell us what WAI is in the first sentence - without being 
too pedantic - and provides practical links to what the site contains in 
the remainder.

Chuck Letourneau
Starling Access Services

 From Carol J. Smith:
WAI is your resource for Web accessibility.  WAI includes: resources to 
help you create accessible websites; design software that supports 
production of accessible Web sites; and design accessible browsers in order 
to make the internet accessible for everyone.

 From Blossom Michaeloff:
WAI pursues accessibility of the Web through its work in technology, 
guidelines, tools, education and outreach, and research and development.
WAI is also your resource for Web accessibility. This site includes 
resources to help you learn more about accessibility and create accessible 
Web sites, browsers, and Web applications that make the Web accessible for 
everyone.

 From Shawn Lawton Henry:
"WAI develops international guidelines and supporting resources to
increase accessibility of the Web for people with disabilities."

or

"WAI works with organizations around the world to develop guidelines and 
supporting resources to help make the Web accessible for people with 
disabilities. This site has two main sections:
     - About WAI
     - Guidelines and Resources, which includes
         -- Getting Started
         -- Guidelines and Techniques
         -- General Resources, Promoting and Implementing, Evaluating,
Developing Training"

 From Charmane Corcoran:
WAI is a primary resource for Web accessibility. This site includes:
information, tools, and resources to help you formulate best business
web policies and training materials, create accessible web sites;
design software that supports production of accessible Web sites; and
design accessible browsers in order to make the Internet accessible
for everyone.
Received on Thursday, 29 April 2004 17:45:25 UTC

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.3.1 : Tuesday, 6 January 2015 21:55:51 UTC