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Re: Request for quick feedback to WAI EOWG

From: Leonard R. Kasday <kasday@acm.org>
Date: Fri, 06 Nov 1998 17:38:08 -0500
Message-Id: <3.0.32.19981106173759.0088b6e0@pop3.concentric.net>
To: jbrewer@w3.org (Judy Brewer)
Cc: w3c-wai-eo@w3.org
I don't see in the card:

-for image maps, use ALT text for all AREA elements. (item 4 doesn't do it
for me)
-also, repeat links as text on page
-for images of text, put all text in ALT
- pausing or freezing of blinking, scrolling, etc. which is priority 1 in GL

I question how much we want to

- tell people to not use tables for format.  It's only priority 2 in
guidelines, and it allowed until "a majority of browsers in use" support
style sheets".  I'm afraid so many authors rely on tables that they will
rebel at card, with some justification.

- spend card space talking about "consistent page organization"  The only
people who would respond to that design their pages consistently already,
or at least think they do.

Other comments

> Frames  Some Web technologies cannot render frames. Label each frame with
> title or name, and include a linear version of its content within the
> NOFRAMES element.

It confused me to jump from web technologies not rendering frames, to
labeling each frame with title or name, and then back to NOFRAMES

Len


you wrote
-------------------------------------------------

[W3C logo]                           [WAI logo]
Quick tips for making your site accessible to people 
with disabilities & users of mobile or slow Web devices
1       Images, photographs & animations  Concisely describe the purpose or
content of all visuals. Use the alt attribute.
2       Page organization  A consistent page layout helps people with
visual and
learning disabilities. Use headings, lists and table summaries to make
pages easy to scan.
3       Imagemaps  Many people cannot use a mouse. Use the MAP element to
provide
imagemap hotspot text anchors.
4       Hypertext links  Descriptive link text improves access for those who
cannot see. Ensure that each link makes sense when read alone.
5       Graphs & charts  Summarize content or use the longdesc attribute.
 6      Audio  For people who cannot hear audio content, provide captions or
transcripts.
7       Video  Provide text or audio descriptions of video content. 
8       Frames  Some Web technologies cannot render frames. Label each
frame with
title or name, and include a linear version of its content within the
NOFRAMES element.
9       Tables  Some Web technologies have trouble reading tables. Avoid using
tables to format text columns. Use the headers, scope and abbr attributes
to mark-up complex tabular information.
10      Evaluate accessibility  View your site with different browsers; switch
off graphics, sounds and animations; navigate via keyboard; use a
monochrome monitor; use automated analysis tools.


-------
Leonard R. Kasday
Institute on Disabilities/UAP at Temple University, Philadelphia PA
email:     kasday@acm.org
telephone: (215} 204 2247
Received on Friday, 6 November 1998 17:38:17 UTC

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