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Re: [Moderator Action] RE: News Release: XML is Ten!

From: Ian B. Jacobs <ij@w3.org>
Date: Tue, 12 Feb 2008 12:04:15 -0600
To: Paul Krill <Paul_Krill@infoworld.com>
Cc: w3c-news@w3.org
Message-Id: <1202839455.14350.3.camel@localhost>
On Tue, 2008-02-12 at 17:59 +0000, Paul Krill wrote:
> 
> We want to know if you have any videos about the 10th anniversary. A
> long shot, but I am asking anyway 

Hi Paul,

Not yet. I will definitely let you know when we have our first one.

 _ Ian

> -----Original Message-----
> From: w3c-news-request@w3.org [mailto:w3c-news-request@w3.org] On Behalf
> Of Ian B. Jacobs
> Sent: Tuesday, February 12, 2008 8:47 AM
> To: w3c-news@w3.org
> Subject: News Release: XML is Ten!
> 
> W3C XML is Ten!
> Community Invited to Celebrate XML Everywhere
> 
>    http://www.w3.org/ -- 12 February 2008 -- To mark the ten year
>    anniversary of the publication of its Extensible Markup Language
>    (XML) 1.0 as a W3C Recommendation, the World Wide Web Consortium
>    plans throughout 2008 to recognize and thank the dedicated
>    communities and individuals responsible for XML for their
>    contributions - including people who have participated in W3C's XML
>    groups and mailing lists, the SGML community, and xml-dev -
>    through a variety of activities and events. XML is a simple, open,
>    and flexible format used to exchange a wide variety of data on and
>    off the Web. The success of XML is a strong indicator of how
>    dedicated individuals, working within the W3C Process, can engage
>    with a larger community to produce industry-changing results.
> 
> See the full text below.
> 
> - Ian Jacobs Head of W3C Communications
> 
> ----------
> Resources
> ----------
> 
> XML10 home page: 
>   http://www.w3.org/2008/xml10/
> 
> XML10 greeting card:
>   http://www.w3.org/2008/xml10/card/greeting-form
> 
> This press release:
>   English: http://www.w3.org/2008/xml10/xml10-pressrelease
>   French: http://www.w3.org/2008/02/xml10-pressrelease.html.fr
>   Japanese: http://www.w3.org/2008/02/xml10-pressrelease.html.ja
>   Other languages:
>     http://www.w3.org/Press/#x2008-xml10
> 
> W3C Member Testimonials:
>   http://www.w3.org/2008/xml10/xml10-testimonial
> 
> -------------
> Full press release text
> -------------
> 
> W3C XML is Ten!
> Community Invited to Celebrate XML Everywhere
> 
>      _________________________________________________________
> 
>    Contact Americas, Australia --
>           Ian Jacobs, <ij@w3.org>, +1.718.260.9447 or +1.617.253.2613
> 
>    Contact Europe, Africa and the Middle East --
>           Marie-Claire Forgue, <mcf@w3.org>, +33.492.38.75.94
> 
>    Contact Asia --
>           Yasuyuki Hirakawa <chibao@w3.org>, +81.466.49.1170
>      _________________________________________________________
> 
> 
> http://www.w3.org/ -- 12 February 2008 -- To mark the ten year
>    anniversary of the publication of its Extensible Markup Language
>    (XML) 1.0 as a W3C Recommendation, the World Wide Web Consortium
>    plans throughout 2008 to recognize and thank the dedicated
>    communities and individuals responsible for XML for their
>    contributions - including people who have participated in W3C's XML
>    groups and mailing lists, the SGML community, and xml-dev -
>    through a variety of activities and events. XML is a simple, open,
>    and flexible format used to exchange a wide variety of data on and
>    off the Web. The success of XML is a strong indicator of how
>    dedicated individuals, working within the W3C Process, can engage
>    with a larger community to produce industry-changing results.
> 
> 
> W3C XML is Everywhere
> 
>    "There is essentially no computer in the world, desk-top, hand-held,
>    or back-room, that doesn't process XML sometimes," said Tim Bray of
>    Sun Microsystems. "This is a good thing, because it shows that
>    information can be packaged and transmitted and used in a way that's
>    independent of the kinds of computer and software that are involved.
>    XML won't be the last neutral information-wrapping system; but as
>    the first, it's done very well."
> 
>    Indeed, one can hardly get through the day without using technology
>    that is based on XML in some fashion. When you fill your auto tank
>    with gas, XML often flows from pump to station. When you configure
>    your digital camera, on some models you do so via XML-based
>    graphical controls. When you plug it into a computer, the camera and
>    the operating system communicate with each other in XML. When you
>    download digital music, the software you use to organize it is
>    likely to store information about songs as XML. And when you explore
>    the planet Mars, XML goes with you; see the story about open
>    source on Mars.
> 
> W3C XML a Community Effort
> 
>    W3C would like to extend congratulations to the participants of
>    the XML Working Group that created the standard: Jon Bosak, Paula
>    Angerstein, Tim Bray (co-Editor), James Clark, Dan Connolly, Steve
>    DeRose, Dave Hollander, Eliot Kimber, Tom Magliery, Eve Maler,
>    Murray Maloney, Makoto Murata, Joel Nava, Conleth O'Connell, Jean
>    Paoli (co-Editor), Peter Sharpe, C. M. Sperberg-McQueen (co-Editor),
>    and John Tigue.
> 
> 
>    "The tenth anniversary of XML is a good time to reflect on the
>    reasons for its creation," said Jon Bosak, the Sun Microsystems
>    Distinguished Engineer who organized and led the W3C Working Group
>    that produced the XML 1.0 Recommendation. "XML and its associated
>    standards have conferred so many technical benefits over the years
>    that it's easy to lose track of the forces that motivated the
>    industry to base future web development on a profile of an
>    International Standard, SGML (ISO 8879:1986). Underlying all the
>    technical work was a struggle between users and vendors over the
>    ownership of data. Sun Microsystems sponsored the effort to make XML
>    the standard for web data because we knew that the alternative was a
>    closed, non-interoperable format. Today we celebrate the success of
>    open standards in preserving web data from vendor lock-in. The
>    struggle is far from over, but I'm proud that Sun was able to foster
>    a development that can someday make vendor-independent data a
>    reality."
> 
>    XML is an interoperable standard that supports internationalization,
>    extensibility, composition, and persistence (because the format is
>    open and can also be read by humans in a pinch); learn more about
>    XML-based data formats. XML is supported by a rich toolkit of
>    related standards, including XSLT (for transforming XML content),
>    XQuery (for querying XML databases), Document Object Model (for
>    access in a programming environment), XML Schema, and XML Signature
>    and Encryption. XML interoperability has made it a natural choice
>    for defining both document formats (such as SVG or VoiceXML) and
>    services (both SOAP-based and HTTP-based).
> 
> 
> W3C Continues to Invest in XML
> 
>    W3C has invested in the maintenance of XML since it was first
>    published. Specification maintenance can be a thankless task, but
>    the XML Core Working Group has worked to ensure that community bug
>    reports lead to corrections of the specification. Indeed, on 5
>    February the XML Core Working Group published a Fifth Edition of
>    XML 1.0 as a Proposed Edited Recommendation, inviting the community
>    to review the latest round of changes. W3C also takes this
>    opportunity to thank the XML Core Working Group, and in
>    particular to co-Chairs Paul Grosso and Norm Walsh for their
>    dedication.
> 
> Join the W3C XML10 Celebration
> 
>    As part of the W3C XML10 Celebration, W3C aims to include video
>    interviews of people in the XML community, and to distribute XML10
>    goodies at XML-related events throughout 2008. To support these
>    projects, W3C has invited W3C Members to become XML10 Sponsors. W3C
>    would like to thank the FLWOR Foundation for their generous
>    support of XML10.
> 
>    Using the XML10 Greeting Card, please tell us about your blog
>    entries, videos, articles, XML deployment facts, and other thoughts
>    about XML. Submitted greetings will be public.
> 
> About the World Wide Web Consortium [W3C]
> 
>    The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) is an international consortium
>    where Member organizations, a full-time staff, and the public work
>    together to develop Web standards. W3C primarily pursues its mission
>    through the creation of Web standards and guidelines designed to
>    ensure long-term growth for the Web. Over 400 organizations are
>    Members of the Consortium. W3C is jointly run by the MIT
>    Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (MIT CSAIL)
>    in the USA, the European Research Consortium for Informatics and
>    Mathematics (ERCIM) headquartered in France and Keio University
>    in Japan,and has additional Offices worldwide. For more
>    information see http://www.w3.org/
> 
> 
> 
-- 
Ian Jacobs (ij@w3.org)   http://www.w3.org/People/Jacobs/
Tel:                     +1 718 260-9447

Received on Tuesday, 12 February 2008 18:04:28 UTC

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