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Re: [http-range14] how to publish RDF for Information Resources

From: Andrea Splendiani (RRes-Roth) <andrea.splendiani@rothamsted.ac.uk>
Date: Fri, 17 Feb 2012 17:18:25 +0000
To: Yang Squared <yang.square@gmail.com>
CC: "<semantic-web@w3.org>" <semantic-web@w3.org>
Message-ID: <C4AA2BC1-70A9-490E-B5E2-2319349BC70C@rothamsted.ac.uk>
Wait...

http://www.test.com/test.html <- this is a resource, and has it's own URI (1)
http://www.test.com/test.rdf <- this is another resource, and has it's own (distinct) URI (2)

Now, what I am saying is that in the RDF you can also predicate on the the URI (1).
So if you ask information about (1), requiring a result in rdf, it seems reasonable to return (2) with predicates (eventually) on (1).
This is not really incorrect, though it may be unpractical for some.

But perhaps I don't get your distinction between page and metadata.

Metadata on the page can also be in the html representation itself.
In RDF I'm asking for a machine readable representation of the content of the page, rather than it's metadata only.

Do you mean something else by metadata ?

ciao,
Andrea



Il giorno 17/feb/2012, alle ore 17.03, Yang Squared ha scritto:

Hi Andrea,

I think using content negotiation is incorrect, the homepage is a resource need a URI, and the metadata RDF is another resource need another URI. Otherwise, we are saying the homepage and the metadata of the homepage is the same thing.

The representation of the homepage is the HTML page
the representation of the metadata of the homepage is the RDF

Regards,
Yang


On Fri, Feb 17, 2012 at 4:24 PM, Andrea Splendiani (RRes-Roth) <andrea.splendiani@rothamsted.ac.uk<mailto:andrea.splendiani@rothamsted.ac.uk>> wrote:
Hi,

I'm using content negotiation.
In most of the cases, the "information resource" is actually something in a database or stored somewhere. So representing it in html or rdf via content negotiation seems plausible.

In case the information resource in html is what you want to predicate (like, you have a collection of html files that you are serving) the rdf returned via content negotiation could include predicates about the html file uri.
If you are asking for the html file resource, this is always in html by definition. Requesting an rdf implies anyway requesting something else.

ciao,
Andrea


Il giorno 17/feb/2012, alle ore 02.21, Yang Squared ha scritto:

Hi all,

I have a Web architecture question here.

Assume I have a information resource URI  http://example.com/homepage.html

I would like to publish a RDF metadata (http://example.com/data/homepagerdf) about this information resource (e.g. homepage isCreatedBy steve). What publishing mechanism can I use?

since http://example.com/homepage.html is an Information Resource, when dereferencing it, we should get that homepage.html document returned. How can we possible redirect to a RDF?

Content negotiation can use to serve two different representation of the resource, but both representation is for the same resource. So we cannot use it.

303 can redirect one information resources to another information resource, e.g. http://example.com/homepage.html --303--> http://example.com/data/homepagerdf --200-->RDF

but in this way, when I dereferencing the original http://example.com/homepage.html it did not result as a homepage.html itself and got a RDF. So there is a paradox here.

Can anyone please suggest anything? Or the conclusion is that the RDFa (or by using the link element to RDF) is the only way to publish RDF metadata for information resources?

I am writing a paper and I would like to conclude that there will be no case that a hashURI publishing mechanism and 303 redirection can be used for Information Resource to publish RDF metadata. Do you have any object case?

------------------------------
One may recommend me to use RDFa. However, I consider that the RDFa is not ideal solution to publish Linked Data at all.
First of all, embedding metadata together with data prohibits the independent curation of data and metadata. Secondly, following the principles of the Web Architecture, any distinct resource of significance should be given a distinct URI, but in this approach a single URI is used to identify two information resources. In general, the RDFa embedded metadata approach can be replaced by using the <link> element href in XHTML to pointing to an external RDF document, where the rel=”meta” attribute can be used to indicate a relationship between resources.

Thanks a lot,
Yang Yang

-----------------------------------

Web and Internet Science

Room 3027 EEE Building

Electronics and Computer Science

University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ


Tel: +44(0)23 8059 8346<tel:%2B44%280%2923%208059%208346>

twitter: @yang_squared<http://twitter.com/#!/yang_squared>




--

-----------------------------------

Web and Internet Science

Room 3027 EEE Building

Electronics and Computer Science

University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ


Tel: +44(0)23 8059 8346<tel:%2B44%280%2923%208059%208346>

twitter: @yang_squared<http://twitter.com/#!/yang_squared>





--

-----------------------------------

Web and Internet Science

Room 3027 EEE Building

Electronics and Computer Science

University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ


Tel: +44(0)23 8059 8346

twitter: @yang_squared<http://twitter.com/#!/yang_squared>
Received on Friday, 17 February 2012 17:19:04 UTC

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