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Re: [Semantic_Web] Ontology Vs Semantic Networks

From: Azamat <abdoul@cytanet.com.cy>
Date: Wed, 30 May 2007 20:52:41 +0300
Message-ID: <001d01c7a2e3$52a88440$a70c7d0a@homepc>
To: "'SW-forum'" <semantic-web@w3.org>
Cc: "Matt Williams" <matthew.williams@cancer.org.uk>

 I would also recommend John Sowa's Knowledge Representation.

Although i am  in close sympaphy with John's works, they'd better be avoided 
by the ontology newcomers.  The reasons why it is so please refer to 
http://www/eis/com.cy/E-forums.pdf .

Azamat Abdoullaev


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Matt Williams" <matthew.williams@cancer.org.uk>
To: "Simon Margulies" <simon.margulies@unibas.ch>; "Semantic Web" 
<semantic-web@w3.org>
Sent: Wednesday, May 30, 2007 8:19 PM
Subject: Re: [Semantic_Web] Ontology Vs Semantic Networks


>
> I would also recommend John Sowa's Knowledge Representation
>
> Matt
>
> Simon Margulies wrote:
>> thanks a lot for this post!
>>
>> I'm writing about ontologies as historical resources, which could be 
>> researched by future historians. In other words, what historians need to 
>> know about ontology concepts, to be able to analyze a preserved ontology 
>> to conclude some information about the past.
>>
>> So far I understand ontologies (in computer science) as having emerged 
>> out of earlier approaches for knowledge based systems like semantic 
>> networks or framebased languages by defining not only the syntax (like 
>> semantic networks or framebased languages) but adding explicit formal 
>> semantics in form of description logic. Thereby it gets possible, that 
>> several independent systems can share one ontology whereas in the former 
>> to this could be a problem. As an information source I can recommend: - 
>> Ulrich Reimer: Einführung in die Wissensrepräsentation. Netzartige und 
>> schema-basierte Repräsentationsformate. Stuttgart 1991.
>> - Baader, F.: Calvanese, D; et al. The Description Logic Handbook. 
>> Cambridge 2003.
>> (both in German..)
>>
>> Being historian writing about concepts in computer science, I struggle 
>> often with not-precise and not-consistently used definitions in that 
>> field.. I consider such exchanges most valuable and would be happy about 
>> any corrections!
>>
>> Simon
>>
>> On 29.05.2007, at 10:14, Danny Ayers wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> [cc'ing semantic-web@w3.org <mailto:semantic-web@w3.org>]
>>>
>>> On 28/05/07, james.jim.taylor@gmail.com 
>>> <mailto:james.jim.taylor@gmail.com> <james.jim.taylor@gmail.com 
>>> <mailto:james.jim.taylor@gmail.com>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> How can we distinguish between ontologies and semantic networks, and
>>>> in what respects are they similar.
>>>>
>>>> I would appreciate any comments or references explaining that.
>>>
>>> Mmm, homework...
>>>
>>> Broadly speaking any graph-shaped knowledge representation (including
>>> e.g. OWL ontologies, RDF data) could be described as semantic
>>> networks. But if memory serves, historically semantic networks tended
>>> to lack logical formalism, more along the lines of mindmaps - a
>>> precursor to things like RDF/OWL.
>>>
>>> John Sowa has a survey at:
>>> http://www.jfsowa.com/pubs/semnet.htm
>>>
>>> Cheers,
>>> Danny.
>>>
>>> -- 
>>>
>>> http://dannyayers.com
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Simon Margulies, lic. phil. hist.
>> University of Basel
>> Imaging & Media Lab
>> +41 61 267 04 88
>> http://www.distarnet.ch
>>
>
> -- 
> http://acl.icnet.uk/~mw
> http://adhominem.blogsome.com/
> +44 (0)7834 899570
> 
Received on Wednesday, 30 May 2007 17:52:57 UTC

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