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[whatwg] Lifting cross-origin XMLHttpRequest restrictions?

From: Brett Zamir <brettz9@yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 12 Mar 2010 15:35:48 +0800
Message-ID: <4B99EED4.3090906@yahoo.com>
Hi,

My apologies if this has been covered before, or if my asking this is a 
bit dense, but I don't understand why there are restrictions on 
obtaining data via XMLHttpRequest from other domains, if the request 
could be sandboxed to avoid passing along sensitive user data like 
cookies (or if the user could be asked for permission, as when 
installing browser extensions that offer similar privileges).

Servers are already free to obtain and mix in content from other sites, 
so why can't client-side HTML JavaScript be similarly empowered?

If the concern is simply to give servers more control and avoid Denial 
of Service effects, why not at least make the blocking opt in (like 
robots.txt)? There are a great many uses for being able to mash up data 
from other sites, including from the client, and it seems to me to be 
unnecessarily restrictive to require explicit permissions. Despite my 
suggesting opt-in blocking as an alternative, I wouldn't even think 
there should be this option at all, since servers are technically free 
to grab such content unhindered, and everyone I believe should have the 
freedom and convenience to be able to design and enjoy applications 
which "just work"--mixing from other pages without extra effort, unless 
they are legally prohibited from doing so.

If the concern is copyright infringement, the same concern holds true 
for servers which can already obtain such content unrestricted, and I do 
not believe overly cautious preemptive policing is a valid pretext for 
constraining technology and its opportunities for sites and users.

thanks,
Brett
Received on Thursday, 11 March 2010 23:35:48 UTC

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