W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > whatwg@whatwg.org > August 2008

[whatwg] Client-side includes proposal

From: Zac Spitzer <zac.spitzer@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2008 23:37:30 +1000
Message-ID: <7a85053e0808190637n2d33d48aua8ad2419df24ee2e@mail.gmail.com>
It sounds like a request for <object src="document.html"></object>

which would end up like an inline IFRAME

This is such a  common use case and just because you can do it with
SSI means zlich,
it presents challenges which sure, you can work around, but everyone
will do it with a different
way whether via javascript or a server side approach

When it's so common, it's a good case for being standardised into some
thing simple.

XML or XLST is too heavy, simple problem, simple solutions

this also has potential for significant page speed improvements and
for reducing overall page sizes

z


On Tue, Aug 19, 2008 at 10:55 PM, Elliotte Harold
<elharo at metalab.unc.edu> wrote:
> Ian Hickson wrote:
>
>> Server-based offline Web apps are applications that are served by a remote
>> server and then cached locally; this is very different from non-Web cases
>> such as documentation on a local filesystem or on CD-ROMs. In the case of
>> non-Web content, the use of HTML is an academic point, since any format
>> would work as well.
>
> Really? Why? and how? That's certainly not self-evident.
>
> Aside from embedded links, which can point into the file system and are
> usually relative anyway, there's very little web-specific about HTML. It's
> just one format that can be served over HTTP or read from a disk, just like
> PDF or text/plain or OpenDocument.
>
> HTML has some nice characteristics like resolution independence, direct
> editability as text, and automatic reflow; but these are in no way limited
> to network transfers. For many use cases, especially cross-platform ones,
> HTML is the formatted text format of choice.
>
> A properly designed HTML spec should not require, prohibit, or preference  a
> document being read from the network or from a local file system or via any
> other protocol. HTML 1 through 4 and XHTML 1 and 2 had this important
> characteristic. I hope HTML 5 does as well.
>
> --
> Elliotte Rusty Harold  elharo at metalab.unc.edu
> Refactoring HTML Just Published!
> http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN=0321503635/ref=nosim/cafeaulaitA
>



-- 
Zac Spitzer -
http://zacster.blogspot.com (My Blog)
+61 405 847 168
Received on Tuesday, 19 August 2008 06:37:30 UTC

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