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Re: Interactive Television

From: Silvia Pfeiffer <silviapfeiffer1@gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 12 Aug 2011 18:33:03 +1000
Message-ID: <CAHp8n2=vpfYL=5PNfq5hkm69bB6CZRWVSiGE-mKLiTPkt3Ce2w@mail.gmail.com>
To: Adam Sobieski <adamsobieski@hotmail.com>
Cc: public-web-and-tv@w3.org
Hi Adam,

I believe all of these use cases are indeed possible with the existing
specs of <track> in HTML5 (once implemented in browsers). You'll need
a JavaScript developer to make it happen, but the functionality is
there.

For the navigation case, we have worked on temporal media fragment
URIs http://www.w3.org/2008/WebVideo/Fragments/WD-media-fragments-spec/
which will help that use case. A first implementation experiment is
now in Firefox on that features.

Cheers,
Silvia.


On Fri, Aug 12, 2011 at 5:59 PM, Adam Sobieski <adamsobieski@hotmail.com> wrote:
> Silvia,
>
> Some scenarios that interest me are searchable and navigable transcripts
> such as illustrated at http://www.cspan.org.  Video tracks can provide data
> for JavaScript to make use of DHTML for user interfaces for navigation
> within and between videos.
>
> For educational video websites, I would like transcript-style and even
> outline-tree-based navigation.  Crowdsourced collections of video can become
> more encyclopedic and otherwise enhance rapidized research and discovery.
>
> Another use case is video blogging.  In addition to more intuitive video
> blogging and post-production software for end users, I would like for end
> users to be able to make use of ubiquitous multimedia content selection with
> extensible context menus to comment to, respond to and interact with one
> another about arbitrary selections of multimedia content.
>
> Another use case pertains to video format presentations of publications and
> reports for general, scientific, scholarly and business communication.  For
> many communication needs, document elements like charts, diagrams,
> equations, figures, graphs, tables, and so forth, can be in videos while
> also functional objects for computing.  These video document objects can
> also be interactive. MathML3, presentation and content layers, can
> facilitate more robustly interoperating mathematical objects from within and
> between videos.
>
> Furthermore, it is possible, that drag and drop could be facilitated to and
> from videos.  A speaker in a video could indicate scientific equations while
> equations appeared on the screen, and then users could drag and drop those
> mathematical objects into applications where they robustly interoperated
> from within and even between videos.
>
>
>
> Kind regards,
>
> Adam
>
>
>> From: silviapfeiffer1@gmail.com
>> Date: Fri, 12 Aug 2011 10:56:25 +1000
>> Subject: Re: Interactive Television
>> To: adamsobieski@hotmail.com
>> CC: public-web-and-tv@w3.org
>>
>> Hi Adam,
>>
>> what you are suggesting is already possible with the current
>> specification of <track> and a @kind=metadata and the xml or json
>> included in a WebVTT file's cues. We just need to wait until the
>> browsers have actually implemented and released it.
>>
>> That's why I was more curious to find out if we have any more specific
>> application needs that actually require standardisation and suggested
>> analysing them.
>>
>> I think what Bob is doing sounds very interesting in this context.
>> ETV, ads and parental control are indeed interesting use cases. Bob:
>> do you have more information on these and specification proposals?
>>
>> Cheers,
>> Silvia.
>>
>> On Fri, Aug 12, 2011 at 1:33 AM, Adam Sobieski <adamsobieski@hotmail.com>
>> wrote:
>> > Silvia Pfeiffer,
>> >
>> > With regard to the HTML5 video track ideas, I disagree with the
>> > indicated
>> > approach of analyzing exact needs and use cases first; the benefits that
>> > the
>> > particular concepts bring to HTML5 video tracks are sufficiently broad
>> > and
>> > general use that an exact needs and use cases approach seems suboptimal.
>> > The best option is both XML and JSON.  Browser teams already have both
>> > XML
>> > and JSON parsers and libraries handy and some data structures and
>> > heuristics
>> > might be reusable between XML and JSON implementations for the described
>> > <track/> object.  I like the extensiblity of XML and what I like about
>> > the
>> > JSON approach is the convenient JavaScript syntax in the callback
>> > functions.
>> >
>> > I previously forwarded the XML ideas to the HTML5 working group.
>> > Perhaps
>> > you can send an email describing the JSON <track/> idea to the HTML5
>> > video
>> > working group.
>> >
>> > Annotation as the kind for post-produced overlays sounds worthwhile.  I
>> > agree that exploring use cases on that makes sense.  That could include
>> > an
>> > automation of some DHTML premises and perhaps some XAML concepts.
>> >
>> >
>> > Kind regards,
>> >
>> > Adam Sobieski
>> >
>> >
>> >> From: silviapfeiffer1@gmail.com
>> >> Date: Thu, 11 Aug 2011 17:08:33 +1000
>> >> Subject: Re: Interactive Television
>> >> To: adamsobieski@hotmail.com
>> >> CC: scott.bradley.wilson@gmail.com; public-web-and-tv@w3.org
>> >>
>> >> On Thu, Aug 11, 2011 at 4:35 PM, Adam Sobieski
>> >> <adamsobieski@hotmail.com>
>> >> wrote:
>> >> > Hello Silvia,
>> >> >
>> >> > I like the idea about a new kind or kinds, possibly "xml" and/or
>> >> > "json".
>> >> > Those could be catchalls for usage scenarios beyond the other kinds
>> >> > of
>> >> > subtitles, captions, descriptions, chapters and metadata. Another
>> >> > possible
>> >> > kind is outlines which resembles chapters.
>> >>
>> >> Metadata is already a catch-all. I think we first need to analyse what
>> >> exact needs / use cases we have before making a decision.
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> > Your example about DHTML overlays with hyperlinks sounds interesting;
>> >> > DHTML
>> >> > overlays are possible wherever text and graphics presently occur atop
>> >> > video
>> >> > from video post-production techniques and new enhanced features are
>> >> > possible
>> >> > with hypertext. Video post-production techniques can make use HTML5
>> >> > video
>> >> > capabilities, DHTML and overlays and so doing might provide for
>> >> > entirely
>> >> > new
>> >> > features.
>> >>
>> >> We should then consider asking for a @kind=annotation and specify this
>> >> use case some further. Also JSON may not necessarily the best solution
>> >> for this use case. We should experiment with JavaScript first. This
>> >> way we can identify the best possible solution.
>> >>
>> >> > I think that more kinds alleviates a misunderstanding that under
>> >> > discussion
>> >> > was some sort of alternative to WebVTT. WebVTT seems apt for its set
>> >> > of
>> >> > kinds and could even be of use in convergence scenarios such as
>> >> > digital
>> >> > cable. New kinds for HTML5 video tracks, "xml" and/or "json", can
>> >> > allow
>> >> > for
>> >> > more Flash-like functionality with HTML5. By specifying an XML format
>> >> > with
>> >> > at least attributes for temporal intervals, any XML that makes use of
>> >> > that
>> >> > XMLNS could include time synchronization data that <track/> expects.
>> >>
>> >> Yes, WebVTT is designed to be a general container for
>> >> time-synchronized data. But as I said: we should analyse the use cases
>> >> in more detail and come up with better means of semantically labelling
>> >> the included data than by format.
>> >>
>> >> > With regard to HTML5 video, it seems that new kinds are exciting to
>> >> > discuss.
>> >>
>> >> Very much so!
>> >>
>> >> Cheers,
>> >> Silvia.
>> >
>
Received on Friday, 12 August 2011 08:33:59 UTC

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