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RE: [OEP] Semantic Interoperability/Integration Note

From: Uschold, Michael F <michael.f.uschold@boeing.com>
Date: Mon, 19 Sep 2005 20:12:32 -0700
Message-ID: <4301AFA5A72736428DA388B73676A381B4C8D3@XCH-NW-6V1.nw.nos.boeing.com>
To: "Frank Manola" <fmanola@acm.org>
Cc: <public-swbp-wg@w3.org>

You make a good point, worth mentioning in our note.

Mike


============================================
Mike Uschold
Tel: 425 865-3605              Fax: 425 865-2965
============================================



>  -----Original Message-----
>  From: Frank Manola [mailto:fmanola@acm.org] 
>  Sent: Monday, September 19, 2005 1:32 PM
>  To: Uschold, Michael F
>  Cc: public-swbp-wg@w3.org
>  Subject: Re: [OEP] Semantic Interoperability/Integration Note
>  
>  
>  Uschold, Michael F wrote:
>  > Here is an outline draft for discussion at today's telecon.
>  > 
>  >  <<SemanticII-v4.htm>>
>  > Mike
>  
>  Mike--
>  
>  This note is a good start to an important subject.  One comment that 
>  immediately came to mind when I read it was the following:  
>  At the end 
>  of section 3 is the bullet:
>  
>  >     * /More expressive rules and constructs for mappings/: 
>  some of the
>  >       mappings between ontologies required for 
>  interoperability between
>  >       them may require constructs that go beyond the 
>  expressiveness of
>  >       RDF and OWL, such as operations on numbers and 
>  strings, @@ another
>  >       example here
>  > 
>  
>  This is certainly true, but in some cases those same constructs are 
>  useful *within* an ontology, rather than just in mapping 
>  between them. 
>  An example that immediately came to mind (because I've been 
>  working with 
>  it recently) is Body Mass Index.  The NCI defines this as "a general 
>  indicator of the body fat an individual is carrying based 
>  upon the ratio 
>  of weight to height".  However, other definitions of this 
>  concept (e.g., 
>  there's one in the NCI's Common Data Element browser) 
>  sometimes include 
>  a specific formula to be used in computing this quantity 
>  (patient body 
>  weight in kilograms divided by the square of his/her height 
>  in meters). 
>     Similar examples are far from rare (depending, of course, on the 
>  ontology).
>  
>  --Frank
>  
Received on Tuesday, 20 September 2005 03:12:40 UTC

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