Re: Privacy Icon Study

Thank You Lorrie

This is very useful and great effort.

On 2 Mar 2011, at 01:32, Lorrie Faith Cranor wrote:

> I have concerns that DNT in its current form does not provide a way  
> for sites to signal back that they will respect the user's no  
> tracking signal. Based on my P3P experience, I am also very  
> concerned about incentives for adoption.
>
> There is some useful information about the DNT proposal at
> https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2011/02/what-does-track-do-not-track- 
> mean
>
> I'm working on a paper reflecting on 15 years of efforts to develop  
> privacy icons and machine-readable privacy policies... I turned an  
> excerpt of it into my comments to the FTC, which you can find at
> http://www.ftc.gov/os/comments/privacyreportframework/00453-58003.pdf
>
> --
> Lorrie Faith Cranor  lorrie@cmu.edu  http://lorrie.cranor.org/
> Associate Professor, Computer Science and Engineering & Public Policy
> CyLab Usable Privacy and Security Laboratory  http://cups.cs.cmu.edu/
> Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213
>
>
>
> On Mar 1, 2011, at 7:47 PM, David Singer wrote:
>
>>
>> On Mar 1, 2011, at 2:04 , Mark Lizar wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> Thanks Jean,
>>>
>>> On 1 Mar 2011, at 08:38, <jeanpierre.lerouzic@orange-ftgroup.com>  
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Hi all,
>>>>
>>>> Your remarks are certainly very important on a theoretical point  
>>>> of view, thanks for launching the discussion.
>>>>
>>>> If your browser says "do not track me", you can legally sue the  
>>>> company that tracked you on many juridictions. You don't need  
>>>> electronic signatures or trusted third parties for that.
>>>
>>> So you are suggesting that first, me (a web browsing user) is  
>>> going to realise that I am being tracked (even though I am on a do  
>>> not track list) then that I am going to call/email a lawyer to sue  
>>> this tracking website? Is there a possibility this would be  
>>> successful?  (In any jurisdiction)
>>
>> Yes, this is not like "Do not call".  If someone violates "Do not  
>> call", I know -- I get called.  If someone violates "Do not track"  
>> I may not know for ages, if ever -- the tracking was internal to  
>> them and the places they made it available to.  It is a worry, I  
>> think -- that doesn't make it useless, however.
>>
>>
>> David Singer
>> Multimedia and Software Standards, Apple Inc.
>>
>

Received on Thursday, 3 March 2011 13:59:08 UTC