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Re: Count of annotations by xpath?

From: Robert Sanderson <azaroth42@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Oct 2017 09:02:07 -0700
Message-ID: <CABevsUERpqu-cDFSuBr_psFSsF=AdQE0U9WVBv7d+X5A_qgNrg@mail.gmail.com>
To: Ronald Snyder <Ronald.Snyder@ithaka.org>
Cc: "public-openannotation@w3.org" <public-openannotation@w3.org>
Hi Ron,

Currently the protocol does not address bulk operations such as counting,
summarizing, filtering or searching.  It only addresses item level
operations of create, retrieve, update and delete.

A future version of the protocol might include such methods, and it would
be great to work on a list of desired operations, with use cases and
implementations to demonstrate the necessity of the work.

Rob


On Tue, Oct 3, 2017 at 5:14 AM, Ronald Snyder <Ronald.Snyder@ithaka.org>
wrote:

> Greetings -
>
>
>
> For an application that we’re developing we need to get a summary of
> annotations for a target that includes a count of all annotations grouped
> by xpath selector value (this would be analogous to a faceted search
> request/response).  It’s not clear if/how this is supported by the Web
> Annotation Protocol.  We are currently using the MangoServer implementation
> for an early prototype of the application.  Any suggestions, examples,
> pointers to documentation, etc on how this might be accomplished would be
> much appreciated.
>
>
>
> For a little more background and context…
>
>
>
> We (JSTOR Labs) developed a proof of concept application a couple years
> ago to explore the idea of connecting scholarship to primary texts
> (literary works, historic documents, etc) using quoted passages that were
> mined from journal articles and connected to the primary text using a fuzzy
> text matching algorithm.  Two public prototypes of the concept were
> produced, one for Shakespeare plays and another for the US Constitution.
> The Shakespeare prototype can be seen here – https://labs.jstor.org/
> shakespeare.  The prototype for the US Constitution was developed as a
> mobile app and is described here – http://labs.jstor.org/constitution/.
>
>
>
> As a proof of concept this has received a very positive reaction by the
> academic community and we are now embarking on a project to significantly
> expand the approach providing matches to many more texts and ideally do so
> in a manner that would enable other providers of scholarship (or anyone,
> for that matter) to connect non-JSTOR content to the same texts.  In this
> next generation version of the tools/infrastructure, we intend to base the
> implementation on the Web Annotation Data Model and Protocol and open
> source code to maximize interoperability and community involvement.  In
> this next version, the matched passages in the primary text and journal
> articles will be represented as a pair of annotations, one anchored in the
> primary text using an XPathSelector and another anchored in the journal
> article (often as a media fragment as these targets will typically be page
> scan images).
>
>
>
> As can be seen in the Understanding Shakespeare site some of the texts
> (Hamlet, for instance) have thousands of matched quotes, the line “To be or
> not to be” alone has nearly 1000 quoting articles (http://labs.jstor.org/
> shakespeare/hamlet#line-3.1.64).  Given the volume of matches for many
> works it’s really not practical to grab all of the matches (annotations)
> for a work at one time.  Our approach has been to get a summary count that
> reflects the number of matched quotes/articles for a given chunk of text in
> a work (e.g., each act, scene, and/or line in a Shakespeare play) and then
> get matches for that chunk of text only after a user has expressed interest
> in it (clicking on a linked summary count, etc).
>
>
>
> In an implementation of something like the Understanding Shakespeare site
> using the Web Annotation Protocol how would one request a count of
> annotations based on distinct XPath value?
>
>
>
> Ron
>
>
>
> --
>
> Ron Snyder
>
> Director of Research & Development, JSTOR Labs
>
> 301 E. Liberty St
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=301+E.+Liberty+St%0D+%0D+%0D+Suite+300%0D+%0D+%0D+Ann+Arbor,+MI+48104&entry=gmail&source=g>
>
> Suite 300
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=301+E.+Liberty+St%0D+%0D+%0D+Suite+300%0D+%0D+%0D+Ann+Arbor,+MI+48104&entry=gmail&source=g>
>
> Ann Arbor, MI 48104
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=301+E.+Liberty+St%0D+%0D+%0D+Suite+300%0D+%0D+%0D+Ann+Arbor,+MI+48104&entry=gmail&source=g>
>
> Ron.Snyder@ithaka.org
>
> Twitter: @rdsnyderjr
>
>
>



-- 
Rob Sanderson
Semantic Architect
The Getty Trust
Los Angeles, CA 90049
Received on Tuesday, 3 October 2017 16:02:31 UTC

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