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CVS WWW/International/multilingualweb/lt/drafts/its20

From: CVS User fsasaki <cvsmail@w3.org>
Date: Fri, 06 Sep 2013 12:42:46 +0000
Message-Id: <E1VHvN8-00044o-Qq@gil.w3.org>
To: public-multilingualweb-lt-commits@w3.org
Update of /w3ccvs/WWW/International/multilingualweb/lt/drafts/its20
In directory gil:/tmp/cvs-serv15670

Modified Files:
	its20.html its20.odd 
Log Message:
spell fix

--- /w3ccvs/WWW/International/multilingualweb/lt/drafts/its20/its20.html	2013/09/06 11:29:53	1.496
+++ /w3ccvs/WWW/International/multilingualweb/lt/drafts/its20/its20.html	2013/09/06 12:42:46	1.497
@@ -2604,7 +2604,7 @@
 <h4><a href="#contents" shape="rect"><img src="images/topOfPage.gif" align="right" height="26" width="26" title="Go to the table of contents." alt="Go to the table of contents."/></a><a name="lqissue-definition" id="lqissue-definition" shape="rect"/>8.16.1 Definition</h4><p>The <a href="#lqissue" shape="rect">Localization Quality Issue</a> data category is used to
               express information related to localization quality assessment tasks. Such tasks can
               be conducted on the translation of some source content (such as a text or an image) into a target language or on the
-              source content itself where its quality may impact on the localization process.</p><div class="note"><p class="prefix"><b>Note:</b></p><p>Automated or manual quality assessment is one area of quality management for translational and localization. An example of existing quality assessment is in-country review (e.g., as part of a language acceptance test for software). An important part of quality assessment is the list of issue types that are being used. Very often, simple issue categories like "correct/incorrect" or "like/dislike" are inadequate; instead, more specific ones such as "terminology" or "grammar" are more helpful in identifying concrete reasons for quality problems and for obtaining a more objective picture of quality levels.</p><p>Non-normative terminology related to localization quality as used in this section is provided in <a class="section-ref" href="#localization-quality-guidance" shape="rect">Appendix H: Localization Quality Guidance</a>.</p></div><p>This data category canbe used in a number of ways, including the following example
+              source content itself where its quality may impact on the localization process.</p><div class="note"><p class="prefix"><b>Note:</b></p><p>Automated or manual quality assessment is one area of quality management for translation and localization. An example of existing quality assessment is in-country review (e.g., as part of a language acceptance test for software). An important part of quality assessment is the list of issue types that are being used. Very often, simple issue categories like "correct/incorrect" or "like/dislike" are inadequate; instead, more specific ones such as "terminology" or "grammar" are more helpful in identifying concrete reasons for quality problems and for obtaining a more objective picture of quality levels.</p><p>Non-normative terminology related to localization quality as used in this section is provided in <a class="section-ref" href="#localization-quality-guidance" shape="rect">Appendix H: Localization Quality Guidance</a>.</p></div><p>This data category can b used in a number of ways, including the following example
               scenarios:</p><ul><li><p>A human reviewer working with a web-based tool adds quality markup manually in a text editor, including comments and suggestions, to localized content as part of the review process. A subsequent process examines this markup to ensure that changes were made.</p></li><li><p>A fully automatic quality checking tool flags a number of potential quality issues in an XML or HTML file and marks them up using ITS 2.0 markup. A human reviewer then uses another tool to examine this markup and decide whether the file needs to receive more extensive review or be passed on for further processing without a further manual review stage.</p></li><li><p>A quality assessment process identifies a number of issues and adds the ITS markup to a rendered HTML preview of an XML file along with CSS styling that highlights these issues. The resulting HTML file is then sent back to the translator to assist his or her revision efforts.</p></li></ul><div class="note"><p class="prefix"><b>Note:</b></><p id="selecting-issues">What issues should be considered in quality assessment tasks depends on the nature of the project and tools used. Further guidance is beyond the scope of this specification, but implementers may wish to consult the references cited in <a class="section-ref" href="#localization-quality-guidance" shape="rect">Appendix H: Localization Quality Guidance</a>.</p></div><p>The data category defines five pieces of information:</p><a name="lqissueDefs" id="lqissueDefs" shape="rect"/><table border="1" width="100%"><thead><tr><td rowspan="1" colspan="1">Information</td><td rowspan="1" colspan="1">Description</td><td rowspan="1" colspan="1">Value</td><td rowspan="1" colspan="1">Notes</td></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td rowspan="1" colspan="1">Type</td><td rowspan="1" colspan="1">A classifier that groups similar issues into categories (for example to differentiate spelling errors from grammar errors).</td><td rowspan="1" colspan="1">One of the values defined in <a href="#lqissue-typevalues" shape="ect">list of type
                     values</a>.</td><td rowspan="1" colspan="1">ITS 2.0-compliant tools that use these types <a href="#rfc-keywords" shape="rect">MUST</a> map their internal values to these types. If the type of the issue
                   is set to <code>uncategorized</code>, a comment <a href="#rfc-keywords" shape="rect">MUST</a> be specified as well.</td></tr><tr><td rowspan="1" colspan="1">Comment</td><td rowspan="1" colspan="1">A human-readable description of a specific instance of a quality issue.</td><td rowspan="1" colspan="1">Text</td><td rowspan="1" colspan="1">Comments can be used to explain an issue or provide guidance in addressing an issue. For example, a note about a Terminology issue might specify what term should be used.</td></tr><tr><td rowspan="1" colspan="1">Severity</td><td rowspan="1" colspan="1">A classifier for the seriousness of an issue. The seriousness depends on the Quality Model that is being applied. The Quality Model should be made explicit via the Profile Reference.</td><td rowspan="1" colspan="1">A rational number in the interval 0 to 100 (inclusive). The value follows the
--- /w3ccvs/WWW/International/multilingualweb/lt/drafts/its20/its20.odd	2013/09/06 11:29:54	1.511
+++ /w3ccvs/WWW/International/multilingualweb/lt/drafts/its20/its20.odd	2013/09/06 12:42:46	1.512
@@ -3929,7 +3929,7 @@
               be conducted on the translation of some source content (such as a text or an image) into a target language or on the
               source content itself where its quality may impact on the localization process.</p>
             <note>
-              <p>Automated or manual quality assessment is one area of quality management for translational and localization. An example of existing quality assessment is in-country review (e.g., as part of a language acceptance test for software). An important part of quality assessment is the list of issue types that are being used. Very often, simple issue categories like "correct/incorrect" or "like/dislike" are inadequate; instead, more specific ones such as "terminology" or "grammar" are more helpful in identifying concrete reasons for quality problems and for obtaining a more objective picture of quality levels.</p>
+              <p>Automated or manual quality assessment is one area of quality management for translation and localization. An example of existing quality assessment is in-country review (e.g., as part of a language acceptance test for software). An important part of quality assessment is the list of issue types that are being used. Very often, simple issue categories like "correct/incorrect" or "like/dislike" are inadequate; instead, more specific ones such as "terminology" or "grammar" are more helpful in identifying concrete reasons for quality problems and for obtaining a more objective picture of quality levels.</p>
               <p>Non-normative terminology related to localization quality as used in this section is provided in <ptr target="#localization-quality-guidance" type="specref"/>.</p>
             </note>
             <p>This data category can be used in a number of ways, including the following example
Received on Friday, 6 September 2013 12:42:48 UTC

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