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[Bug 14540] what about if the <body> IS an article?

From: <bugzilla@jessica.w3.org>
Date: Sat, 22 Oct 2011 05:24:34 +0000
To: public-html-bugzilla@w3.org
Message-Id: <E1RHU4Q-0006pN-Qj@jessica.w3.org>
http://www.w3.org/Bugs/Public/show_bug.cgi?id=14540

--- Comment #2 from Giorgio <giorgio.liscio@email.it> 2011-10-22 05:24:34 UTC ---
so if I can not mark a page as article, makes <article> totally useless

by the way, I've extended my thought

*please read carefully because this can be interesting and my English is not so
good*

One of the problems of html4 was "site title" vs "document title"

I think html5 should introduce something that resolves this issue.
As I said, my english is not so good so I will try to explain with some code.

the homepage:
<body>
   <h1>bestSPORTWEAR.org</h1>...some nav...
   ...
</body>

product page:
<body>
   <h1>A red NIKE t-shirt</h1>
   <p>A fantastic nike t-shirt with flames and skulls</p>
</body>

now, users want to brand their sites with the same header of the homepage, so,
according to html5 spec:

product page:
<body>
   <!-- now site branding becomes tangentially-related content -->
   <aside><h1>bestSPORTWEAR.org</h1>...some nav...</aside>
   <!-- so bots and accessibility tools can understand the real content of the
document -->
   <h1>A red NIKE t-shirt</h1>
   <p>A fantastic nike t-shirt with flames and skulls</p>
</body>

but examining this:

<body>
   <!-- now site branding becomes tangentially-related content -->
   <aside><h1>bestSPORTWEAR.org</h1>...some nav...</aside>
   <h1>A red NIKE t-shirt</h1>
   <p>A fantastic nike t-shirt with flames and skulls</p>
   <aside>
      <h1>How to wash the t-shirt</h1>
      <!-- another tangentially-related content -->
   </aside>
</body>

seems that "bestSPORTWEAR.org" is at the same level of "how to wash the
t-shirt"
how bots should interpret this? and accessibility tools?
it is nonsense.

I examine another approach:

<body>
   <h1>bestSPORTWEAR.org</h1>
   <section>
      <h1>A red NIKE t-shirt</h1>
      <p>A fantastic nike t-shirt with flames and skulls</p>
      <aside>
         <h1>How to wash the t-shirt</h1>
         <!-- another tangentially-related content -->
      </aside>
   </section>
</body>

now the outline is correct, but bots and accessibility tools can't distinguish
the document title and the site title

a new element can be the answer:
(It's just an example)

<body>
   <parent>
      <h1>bestSPORTWEAR.org</h1>
   </parent>
   <h1>A red NIKE t-shirt</h1>
   <p>A fantastic nike t-shirt with flames and skulls</p>
   <aside>
      <h1>How to wash the t-shirt</h1>
      <!-- another tangentially-related content -->
   </aside>
</body>

the outline will still be:

bestSPORTWEAR.org
    A red NIKE t-shirt
        How to wash the t-shirt

but the document title is now hyper-contextualized
- bots can identify the entry point of a page (the document title)
- bots can distinguish between the document context (the site or something in
the site) and the document's related contents
- users can easily provide meaningful outlines without doubts

another solution can be an attribute, instead of introduce one element

<body>
   <h1>bestSPORTWEAR.org</h1>
   <p><!-- this is the upper content --></p>
   <article entrypoint>
      <p><!-- this is the main page content--></p>
      <h1>A red NIKE t-shirt</h1>
      <p>A fantastic nike t-shirt with flames and skulls</p>
      <aside>
         <h1>How to wash the t-shirt</h1>
         <!-- another tangentially-related content -->
      </aside>
   </article>
</body>

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Received on Saturday, 22 October 2011 05:24:36 UTC

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