W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-html-bugzilla@w3.org > November 2009

[Bug 8365] Remove the Web Browsers Section 6

From: <bugzilla@wiggum.w3.org>
Date: Wed, 25 Nov 2009 00:26:00 +0000
To: public-html-bugzilla@w3.org
Message-Id: <E1ND5ho-0000T6-BZ@wiggum.w3.org>
http://www.w3.org/Bugs/Public/show_bug.cgi?id=8365





--- Comment #11 from Maciej Stachowiak <mjs@apple.com>  2009-11-25 00:25:59 ---
(In reply to comment #9)
> 
> I imagine the section does have useful information. I'm not advocating trashing
> the work. What I am advocating is refocusing the HTML specification back to
> HTML, rather than on applications. 

Most of that section is not specific to "applications". That being said, our
charter scope includes support for both documents and applications.

> To answer your question about eBooks, you can see what's supported in XHTML for
> the open ePub format in this excellent MobileRead site
> http://wiki.mobileread.com/wiki/EPUB. 

Thanks!

> 
> Navigation is actually managed through instructions in a separate XML file.
> Remote resources are accessed, but they have to be listed in the manifest file. 

It looks like there is link traversal, navigation, and networking support, even
if somewhat restricted. It looks like there are no frames or scripting.

> 
> Now, it doesn't make use of all HTML elements. At the same time, the ePub folks
> aren't coming into the HTML WG and demanding that we support OPF in HTML5,
> either. Why? Because that's application specific, and doesn't have a place in a
> general purpose language such as HTML.

Since ePub is defined as a subset of XHTML, it doesn't make sense to me to
remove anything from the HTML5 spec on the basis that ePub doesn't need it.
It's already a subset specification. 

> 
> All applications that make use of HTML or XHTML have their own requirements and
> needs. The appropriate procedure is to define specifications for the
> application functionality, and leave the HTML markup for the HTML WG.
> 

It's true that there are different kinds of HTML clients. HTML5 provides for
this with a variety of conformance classes:
http://dev.w3.org/html5/spec/Overview.html#conformance-requirements

It clearly says that non-scripting UAs are exempt from implementing any of the
scripting features, for instance. The scripting features in section 6 don't
look any different to me in this regard than other scripting- and event-related
requirements throughout the spec.

There doesn't seem to be explicit provision for HTML clients that support
interaction, but never navigate (such as mail clients).


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Received on Wednesday, 25 November 2009 00:26:01 UTC

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