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Re: Musings on PWP Offline/Online Modes

From: Heather Flanagan (RFC Series Editor) <rse@rfc-editor.org>
Date: Mon, 4 Jan 2016 13:56:47 -0800
To: public-digipub-ig@w3.org
Message-ID: <568AEA9F.4050000@rfc-editor.org>

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On 1/4/16 1:05 PM, Bill Kasdorf wrote:
> 
> That's getting a little far afield, I think. Many scholarly
> publications—even as short as a single journal article—reference
> hundreds of other publications. It would never be anybody's intention
> to include those in a PWP.
>

In a different use case, though, such as standards publications, this is
a very useful idea. I can see how a standard with normative references
to other standards might be best packaged as a body of work.

> 
>
> This also gets way out on thin ice on the ownership issue. Somebody
> creating PWP 1 would run into a lot of resistance if she pointed to
> PWP 2 and PWP 3, each authored by others, and asserted that they are
> now part of her PWP 1. Referencing them, okay; _/including/_ them,
> not so much. Depending of course on the rights asserted for PWP 2 and
> PWP 3; certain CC licenses would actually permit that, others
> wouldn't.
>

Well, that's a typical copyright/fair use thing. I don't think we can
solve for that in the PWP spec?

- -Heather

> 
>
> --Bill K
>
>
>
> *From:*Nick Ruffilo [mailto:nickruffilo@gmail.com] *Sent:* Monday,
> January 04, 2016 3:52 PM *To:* Charles LaPierre *Cc:* DPUB mailing
> list (public-digipub-ig@w3.org) *Subject:* Re: Musings on PWP
> Offline/Online Modes
>
>
>
> Another benefit would also be in instant creation of volumes.
> Imagine that you could link to an additional PWP...  Lets ignore the
> possibility for recursion and simply insanely large additions
> (because these are solvable things, although worth noting)
>
>
>
> I don't know TOO much about scholarly publishing, but I can imagine
> being a student writing a thesis paper, and including a host of
> referenced materials.  Imagine if all of those materials could be
> included - and THEIR references.  In most cases, a link would suffice
> (and SHOULD suffice) but there are cases where one would want to
> include the entire reference to allow for deep-reading in an offline
> mode given a consistent and unchanging set of data...
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Mon, Jan 4, 2016 at 3:44 PM, Charles LaPierre
> <charlesl@benetech.org <mailto:charlesl@benetech.org>> wrote:
>
> I like this idea Nick, especially the part about
>
>
>
> This could have many benefits.  Imagine that there are a bunch of
> scholarly publications that all reference a single image/diagram.
> The web-based PWP version can reference a single online canonical
> URL, whereas the offline PWP can have it's own local instance
> (meaning less duplication, and the ability to update all the online
> PWPs at once if there is an update to that image.  This is OPTIONAL,
> so if someone wanted to do a snapshot, they just reference a local
> image.
>
>
>
>
>
> Now lets say there is are extended descriptions for this image, a 3D
> model of this image, and/or a Tactile representation of this image
> with a Tour description explaining what the tactile image is.  Now
> this is done only once and all PWP’s would point to this image with
> its attached extended descriptions.  The packager which would create
> the offline version could also grab these extended descriptions as
> well.  Custom Elements could be used here to interact with these
> alternative representations of the image.
>
>
>
> Thanks.
>
>
>
> Charles LaPierre Sr. Software Engineer charlesl@benetech.org
> <mailto:charlesl@benetech.org>
>
>
>
> On Jan 4, 2016, at 9:28 AM, Nick Ruffilo <nickruffilo@gmail.com
> <mailto:nickruffilo@gmail.com>> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> The conversation today got me thinking - and maybe it's the new year
> crazies, but I got to thinking of the true value of having something
> of a PWP "engine" that would provide unique value.  Below are some
> use cases and what I feel is an interesting way to handle those
> cases:
>
>
>
> *The "vanilla" fully-offline package*
>
> This is probably closest to what epub is today.  All the files for
> the PWP are located in the same base, and besides the occasional <a
> href=""> link that points to an external resource, all items are
> contained within a package.  With little effort, the package can
> exist on a server and as long as there is a reading system that can
> handle the manifest, the content can be read in a linear or whatever
> method we end up with.
>
>
>
> I think we're all in agreement here - ignoring word choice like
> manifest, etc.
>
>
>
>
>
> *The web-page-in-a-box*
>
> Fonts live on other servers, images live on other servers, CSS
> Frameworks live on a CDN, It's a beautiful (messy) web.  How does
> this become offline?  This would require heavy lifting on the part of
> the browser or the server (whatever generates the document) but
> imagine if the packager could take these resources offline.
>
>
>
> /Example/: I'm reading a wikipedia article, and I want to download it
> as a PWP.  Wikipedia could specify a list of resources (heck, even a
> hyper-minified version of their CSS) as well as all the images
> related to that Wikipedia article.  All of those get packaged into a
> PWP that I can download and read whenever.  YES IT WILL BE A SNAPSHOT
> of the page at that time, but that isn't necessarily a bad thing...
> It could even have update instructions (or an update URL).
>
>
>
> External resources get added to the root path in some way like:
> /http/somedomaincom/path/to/external/file.css
>
>
>
> This could have many benefits.  Imagine that there are a bunch of
> scholarly publications that all reference a single image/diagram.
> The web-based PWP version can reference a single online canonical
> URL, whereas the offline PWP can have it's own local instance
> (meaning less duplication, and the ability to update all the online
> PWPs at once if there is an update to that image.  This is OPTIONAL,
> so if someone wanted to do a snapshot, they just reference a local
> image.
>
>
>
> For publishers - they could have a common CSS framework that they
> could keep up-to-date, so that if they found a bug, or decided that
> they wanted body color to be bright orange, they could update it
> once, and all new offline PWPs that are generated get that.
>
>
>
> Since this is 100% optional, those who wanted full control can simply
> opt to create their content fully within a single root.  The ability
> to be able to specify certain online resources to be "critical" to an
> offline package could create production benefits (and yes, I realize
> it could also create some headaches).
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> - Nick Ruffilo
>
> @NickRuffilo
>
> http://Aerbook.com <http://aerbook.com/>
>
> http://twitch.tv/TheWizardLlewyn
>
> http://ZenOfTechnology.com <http://zenoftechnology.com/>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> - Nick Ruffilo
>
> @NickRuffilo
>
> http://Aerbook.com
>
> http://twitch.tv/TheWizardLlewyn
>
> http://ZenOfTechnology.com <http://zenoftechnology.com/>
>
>
>

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Received on Monday, 4 January 2016 21:57:23 UTC

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