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Re: Comments on Draft

From: Irene Polikoff <irene@topquadrant.com>
Date: Mon, 16 Mar 2015 19:43:23 -0400
To: <kcoyle@kcoyle.net>, "public-data-shapes-wg@w3.org" <public-data-shapes-wg@w3.org>
Message-ID: <D12CDE28.24916%irene@topquadrant.com>
Here is a possible rewording of the abstract:

Abstract

SHACL (Shapes Constraint Language) is an RDF vocabulary for describing RDF
graph structures or "shapes˛. SHACL shapes can be used to communicate data
structures associated with some process or interface, generate or validate
data, or drive user interfaces. SHACL includes ability to specify the
scope of constraint applicability such as any RDF node (global) or a
specific node or a specific set of nodes.

SHACL is an extensible language. It provides a built-in high-level
vocabulary for expressing most commonly used constraints such as property
cardinalities and value ranges. It also defines a standard mechanism for
extending SHACL vocabulary with additional terms for describing
constraints. This document defines the SHACL RDF vocabulary together with
its underlying semantics.



On 3/16/15, 7:02 PM, "Karen Coyle" <kcoyle@kcoyle.net> wrote:

>Abstract
>
>SHACL (Shapes Constraint Language) is an RDF vocabulary for describing
>RDF graph structures. Some of these graph structures are captured as
>"shapes", which are expected to correspond to nodes in RDF graphs.
>Shapes provide a high-level vocabulary to identify predicates and their
>associated cardinalities, datatypes and other constraints. Additional
>constraints can either be stated globally or be associated with shapes,
>using SPARQL and similar executable languages. These executable
>languages can also be used to define new high-level vocabulary terms.
>SHACL shapes can be used to communicate data structures associated with
>some process or interface, generate or validate data, or drive user
>interfaces. This document defines the SHACL RDF vocabulary together with
>its underlying semantics.
Received on Monday, 16 March 2015 23:43:58 UTC

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