W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-cognitive-a11y-tf@w3.org > February 2018

Re: Simplified Roadmap Intro (Action-263)

From: Steve Lee <steve@opendirective.com>
Date: Fri, 16 Feb 2018 20:38:14 +0000
Message-ID: <CAEsWMvS2Qs-P=G2hfKBABNNUH80TMcvURpB0xzm-6=7mctLNtg@mail.gmail.com>
To: EA Draffan <ead@ecs.soton.ac.uk>
Cc: "Rochford, John" <john.rochford@umassmed.edu>, "lisa.seeman" <lisa.seeman@zoho.com>, "public-cognitive-a11y-tf@w3.org" <public-cognitive-a11y-tf@w3.org>
John, that really is excellent!
Steve Lee
OpenDirective http://opendirective.com


On 16 February 2018 at 11:56, EA Draffan <ead@ecs.soton.ac.uk> wrote:
> I really liked what you wrote John and I am going to add to the research
> list today if I can find a moment in the work schedule.
>
>
>
> Many thanks for making your paragraphs such an easy read!
>
> Best wishes
>
> E.A.
>
>
>
> Mrs E.A. Draffan
>
> WAIS, ECS , University of Southampton
>
> Mobile +44 (0)7976 289103
>
> http://access.ecs.soton.ac.uk
>
> UK AAATE rep http://www.aaate.net/
>
>
>
> From: Rochford, John [mailto:john.rochford@umassmed.edu]
> Sent: 15 February 2018 13:29
> To: 'lisa.seeman' <lisa.seeman@zoho.com>; public-cognitive-a11y-tf@w3.org
> Subject: Simplified Roadmap Intro (Action-263)
>
>
>
> Hi Lisa and All,
>
>
>
> I was tasked with writing a simplified version of the intro to our Roadmap
> and Gap Analysis. My first draft is immediately below. It is followed by the
> text of the intro section. I welcome everyone’s feedback.
>
>
>
> Our task force is making the Web easier to use by people who have trouble
> thinking. This is hard because:
>
> there is not a lot of info about how people use the Web;
> many people have many needs;
> almost no testing has been done;
> people don’t want to talk about having trouble;
> many Website builders don’t want to help people; and
> text, pictures, and video must be made easy too.
>
>
>
> 1. Introduction
>
> This section is non-normative.
>
> The Cognitive and Learning Disabilities Accessibility Task Force's aim is to
> improve web accessibility for people with cognitive and learning
> disabilities. This is being done as part of the Web Content Accessibility
> Guidelines (WCAG) and Accessible Platform Architecture Working Group (APA
> WG), part of the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) of the W3C. Challenges
> facing this work include:
>
> Lack of availability of open research: Research on this topic tends to be
> behind a “paywall” which means that developers and policy makers may be
> unable to find out what techniques are proven to work to address the needs
> of people with disabilities
> There is a wide range of cognitive disabilities; each type of impairment is
> different, with diverse symptoms and particular digital accessibility
> requirements. This adds to the complexity of knowing how to address user
> needs.
> The advice given in the research and available guidance is often vague and
> is not testable. So, even if developers read the research they would not
> know exactly what to do or when they have reached an acceptable level of
> accessibility.
> Another major challenge is capturing difficulties related to cognitive
> disabilities that may be undeclared. People with cognitive disabilities may
> be embarrassed about their disabilities and may be less likely to request
> accommodations. They may be afraid of discrimination, especially in the work
> place. Others are not aware of their disability or of the impact it has on
> their functioning.
> Attitudes and misinformation can also become a barrier to inclusion for
> people with cognitive disabilities. For example, developers that may feel
> people with cognitive disabilities are not in their "target audience" and so
> have no interest in their inclusion. Also, studies of usability often
> over-sample college students. This can mean that the results work less well
> for those inadequately represented among sub-groups of college students
> (such the aging population).
> Attitudes and misinformation can also become a barrier to inclusion for
> people with cognitive disabilities. For example, developers that may feel
> people with cognitive disabilities are not in their “target audience” and so
> have no interest in their inclusion. Also, studies of usability often
> over-sample college students. Thus the results work less well for groups who
> are not well represented among sub-groups of college students (such the
> aging population).
> Accessibility has typically been based upon the assumption that any website
> can be designed to be usable by people with disabilities. However, when
> making a website usable for people with cognitive disabilities, the content
> itself may need to be changed (e.g. simplified), or support adaptability
> (e.g. multi-modal delivery).
>
>
>
>
>
> John
>
>
>
> John Rochford
> UMass Medical School/E.K. Shriver Center
> Director, INDEX Program
> Instructor, Family Medicine & Community Health
> www.DisabilityInfo.org
> Twitter: @ClearHelper
>
>
>
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Received on Friday, 16 February 2018 20:38:39 UTC

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