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Re: wording for a success criteria to include security concerns and voice systems and others.

From: lisa.seeman <lisa.seeman@zoho.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 15:58:55 +0300
To: Jamie Knight <Jamie.Knight@bbc.co.uk>
Cc: EA Draffan <ead@ecs.soton.ac.uk>, Michael Pluke <Mike.Pluke@castle-consult.com>, public-cognitive-a11y-tf <public-cognitive-a11y-tf@w3.org>
Message-Id: <14f64eec639.dfa22b6a316880.4475161349638761975@zoho.com>
Hi JamieThere is a full issue paper on the issue and on alternatives
See https://rawgit.com/w3c/coga/master/issue-papers/privacy-security.html


All the best

Lisa Seeman

Athena ICT Accessibility Projects 
LinkedIn, Twitter





---- On Tue, 25 Aug 2015 15:30:32 +0300 Jamie Knight&lt;Jamie.Knight@bbc.co.uk&gt; wrote ---- 

 Hello,
 
 
 I think I missed something. What do we suggest authors do instead of CAPTCHAS, strong passwords etc?
 
 
 For example:
 
 
 - use a strong password. Use AT to remember i (eg safari keychain, tools like 1password) and then we talk to those orgs to make setup cog friendly. 
 
 
 - CAPTCHAS - what would we suggest instead? 
 
 
 The phrase works well to describe the problems and what is wrong.
 
 
 Nothing to describe strengths.
 
 
 For example, a maths puzzle may suit autistic users. A visual reasoning puzzle may suit dyslexic users.
 
 
 How can we use our understanding of Ability to improve things.
 
 
 Rather than use examples of being disabled by the environment as a way to tell people they are doing it wrong.
 
 
 Lets suggest ideas for making it better.
 
 
 Hope that's okay, I may be missing the point entirely.
 
 
 Jamie + Lion
 
 Sent from my iPhone
 
 On 25 Aug 2015, at 13:15, lisa.seeman &lt;lisa.seeman@zoho.com&gt; wrote:
 
 
   Thanks EA
 
 All the best
 
 Lisa Seeman
 
 Athena ICT Accessibility Projects
 LinkedIn, Twitter
 
 
 
 
  
 ---- On Tue, 25 Aug 2015 15:05:52 +0300 EA Draffan&lt;ead@ecs.soton.ac.uk&gt; wrote ---- 
 
    Really has a good ring about it!  I agree with Mike and would just deal with the typo…
  
 "Minimize the cognitive skills required to use the content when there is a known alternative."
  
  
  
 3)      Requiring the user to decipher indistinct letters or numbers against a complex background as seen in CAPTCHAs relies on good visual perceptual skills, visual acuity as well as decoding skills.  These abilities are often affected by cognitive impairments.
  
  
  Best wishes
 E.A. 
  
 Mrs E.A. Draffan
 WAIS, ECS , University of Southampton
 Mobile +44 (0)7976 289103
 http://access.ecs.soton.ac.uk
 UK AAATE rep http://www.aaate.net/ 
 http://www.emptech.info
 
  
   From: Michael Pluke [mailto:Mike.Pluke@castle-consult.com] 
 Sent: 25 August 2015 12:01
 To: lisa.seeman &lt;lisa.seeman@zoho.com&gt;; public-cognitive-a11y-tf &lt;public-cognitive-a11y-tf@w3.org&gt;
 Subject: RE: wording for a success criteria to include security concerns and voice systems and others.
 
 
  
 Hi
  
 I think that this is a very good attempt. I think a few good examples would help people understand that this rule is regularly broken in the field of security e.g.
  
 1)      Requiring the user to enter a password relies on the user’s long-term memory and recall. In conditions such as Alzheimer’s, long-term memory and recall abilities will decrease which will force the user to write down the password and hence compromise their security.
 2)      Requiring the user to enter, say, the 3rd, 5th and 8th characters of a password or special word relies on counting, string processing and recognition abilities that are often severely impacted in conditions such as dyslexia and dyscalculia.
  
 Best regards
  
 Mike
  
   From: lisa.seeman [mailto:lisa.seeman@zoho.com] 
 Sent: 25 August 2015 11:33
 To: public-cognitive-a11y-tf &lt;public-cognitive-a11y-tf@w3.org&gt;
 Subject: wording for a success criteria to include security concerns and voice systems and others.
 
 
  
  Hi
  Following the call last night Ayelet and myself came out with the following wording for a technique or success criteria to include security concerns and voice systems and others.
 
   
 "Minimize the cognitive skills required to use the content when there is a know alternative."
 
   
 
  We can follow it with text and examples about alternatives in each topic and a link to the relevant issue paper. The advantage in citing examples is that the technique will endure even as technology and specifics change
   
  All the best
 
 Lisa Seeman
 
 Athena ICT Accessibility Projects
 LinkedIn, Twitter
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
  
Received on Tuesday, 25 August 2015 12:59:25 UTC

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