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Re: Google Can Now Tell You're Not a Robot With Just One Click

From: Steve Lee <steve@opendirective.com>
Date: Tue, 9 Dec 2014 12:43:31 +0000
Message-ID: <CAEsWMvSpa6MOG6g0F2PqFKnXN1jzY+Biqc7FBytYzynBZVTOZw@mail.gmail.com>
To: Elle <nethermind@gmail.com>
Cc: public-cognitive-a11y-tf <public-cognitive-a11y-tf@w3.org>, John Rochford <john.rochford@umassmed.edu>
Elle

Thanks for your great work on this.
1) +1
2) +1


Steve Lee
OpenDirective http://opendirective.com


On 8 December 2014 at 14:40, Elle <nethermind@gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi, Steve:
>
> We've just begun our testing, but we have found that in an authenticated
> state (i.e. logged into Google apps, cached indicators of identity, etc.),
> both VoiceOver/Safari and NVDA/Firefox worked well. Additionally, Dragon
> NaturallySpeaking (14) worked well. We're doing testing on mobile, JAWS, and
> several unauthenticated scenarios this week, and we're setting up some user
> testing to get real-world feedback.
>
> I think that there are two things that are getting confusing in the public
> forums (Twitter, WebAIM, etc.): people seem to maintain that to like this
> solution one must like and approve of CAPTCHA, and people express
> frustration and anger at the inaccessible state of the fallback.  Here's our
> position on both.
>
> CAPTCHA is still a faulty concept. When we talk about early signs of
> accessibility improvements, we aren't saying that this CAPTCHA solution
> provides good for security or that it cannot be hacked. Frankly, that's not
> our concern. We still believe that CAPTCHA is not ideal, since it does put a
> technical problem upon the user to solve, and it's a mousetrap that's bound
> to fail if the cheese is enticing enough.
>
> Intentional improvement, even if not 100%, is still worth praising. When we
> look at scenarios that seem to require the CAPTCHA fallback, it's not an
> improvement, but it's also not any different than it was before Google's
> no-CAPTCHA was released. I humbly maintain that while inaccessible solutions
> should not be tolerated, Google seems to be incurring wrath from even
> attempting to include any accessibility improvements in their most recent
> implementation. Maybe that's why they didn't even mention it in their blog
> posts - what a missed opportunity to educate others about inclusive design.
> I would rather encourage them to keep working at this on the unauthenticated
> state until a better idea comes along.
>
>
> Again, I'd really appreciate anyone's feedback if they've tested this. When
> our next round of testing is complete, we'll publish those results on our
> site (www.simplyaccessible.com).
>
>
> All the best,
> Elle
>
>
> If you want to build a ship, don't drum up the people to gather wood, divide
> the work, and give orders. Instead, teach them to yearn for the vast and
> endless sea.
> - Antoine De Saint-Exupéry, The Little Prince
>
> On Sat, Dec 6, 2014 at 4:16 PM, Steve Lee <steve@opendirective.com> wrote:
>>
>> Elle
>>
>> Thanks, that is positive. Any thing that gets us closer to forcing bots to
>> prove they are human rather than us proving we are not bots is good.
>>
>> What's not clear from that post is if the non mouse interactions ever
>> worked or if they always required the captcha fallback. I assume the latter.
>>
>> What of mobile use which only has touch events? Again I assume fallback
>> only.
>>
>> Steve
>>
>> Autocomplete may have messed with my text
>>
>> On 6 Dec 2014 02:04, "Elle" <nethermind@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>> All:
>>>
>>> We're doing a lot more testing (technical and with real users), but our
>>> first round has been promising:
>>> http://simplyaccessible.com/article/googles-no-captcha/
>>>
>>> We'd also like to test this implementation with those who have struggled
>>> with other CAPTCHA challenges from a cognitive perspective. If anyone has
>>> suggestions on this, please share!
>>>
>>> Much appreciated,
>>> Elle
>>>
>>> On Dec 4, 2014 7:14 AM, "Rochford, John" <john.rochford@umassmed.edu>
>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Hi All,
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Google Can Now Tell You’re Not a Robot With Just One Click
>>>>
>>>> http://www.wired.com/2014/12/google-one-click-recaptcha/
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> This seems promising.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> John
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> John Rochford
>>>> UMass Medical School/E.K. Shriver Center
>>>> Director, INDEX Program
>>>> Instructor, Family Medicine & Community Health
>>>> http://www.DisabilityInfo.org
>>>> Twitter: @ClearHelper
>>>>
>>>>
>
>
Received on Tuesday, 9 December 2014 12:43:59 UTC

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