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RE: Initialization Vector

From: Ed Simon <ed.simon@entrust.com>
Date: Thu, 14 Sep 2000 12:34:04 -0400
Message-ID: <3120721CA75DD411B8340090273D20B10C1BC7@sottmxs06.entrust.com>
To: xml-encryption@w3.org
Yes, I was thinking of SMIL too.

SMIL presents a good litmus test for both XML Signature
and XML Encryption because it combines an XML-encoded control
structure that links both XML-encoded and binary data (eg. video).

To enable digital rights, one would probably want to sign the SMIL
document as well as all the resources it calls.  To attempt to
limit copying, one would want to encrypt content as well in all its
varied forms.  In short, SMIL presents a demanding application for us.

Ed
------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Ed Simon
Software Engineer, Entrust Technologies
email:  ed.simon@entrust.com
ph: (613) 247-2583
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-----Original Message-----
From: Joseph M. Reagle Jr. [mailto:reagle@w3.org]
Sent: Thursday, September 14, 2000 10:55 AM
To: Ed Simon
Cc: xml-encryption@w3.org
Subject: RE: Initialization Vector


At 09:22 9/14/2000 -0400, Ed Simon wrote:
>My guess is that it might be unacceptable to do XML parsing when
>presenting encrypted video.  Any comments on this?  I just can't
>see a re-syncing mechanism, which is operating under extreme time
>constraints, attempting to parse an XML instance to get the info
>it needs.

I don't know much about this sort of thing either, but the paragraph above 
makes me think of SMIL:

http://www.w3.org/AudioVideo/Activity.html
W3C's Synchronized Multimedia Activity has focused on the design of a new 
language for choreographing multimedia presentations where audio, video, 
text and graphics are combined in real-time. The language, the Synchronized 
Multimedia Integration Language (SMIL) is written as an XML application and 
is currently a W3C Recommendation. Simply put, it enables authors to specify

what should be presented when, enabling them to control the precise time 
that a sentence is spoken and make it coincide with the display of a given 
image appearing on the screen.


__
Joseph Reagle Jr.
W3C Policy Analyst                mailto:reagle@w3.org
IETF/W3C XML-Signature Co-Chair   http://www.w3.org/People/Reagle/
Received on Thursday, 14 September 2000 12:40:11 GMT

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