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Re: ACTION-434: Some notes on organizing discussion on WebApps architecture

From: Roy T. Fielding <fielding@gbiv.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2010 16:13:50 -0700
Cc: www-tag@w3.org
Message-Id: <62773B7C-E7C5-4705-BFA3-BC90F52102EB@gbiv.com>
To: Jan Algermissen <algermissen1971@mac.com>
On Oct 17, 2010, at 3:43 PM, Jan Algermissen wrote:
> I understand that the distinction is important but I fail to see why it is particularly important in this special case. Isn't the 'workspace state resource' just another resource?

Yes, if that resource exists, which is why calling the state
of the running application in the user agent a resource (or even a
representation) when no such resource exists is confusing.

> And to verify: Would "my server-side-stored shopping cart" be a suitable example of such a "workspace state resource"?

No.  I am talking about a resource that holds the state of some
portion of the client-side workspace, like a window manager might
maintain the location and content of all open windows.  If you had
a client-side shopping cart (subject to direct manipulation by
user agent, like drag and drop) and the state of that cart
was persisted in the form of a resource, then that would be
an example of such a workspace resource.  Or in Larry's example,
if the running application makes itself available as a resource
in that specific state of execution (a la mobile code), then it
is a resource.  What is not a resource is the normal application
state of a user agent that is merely processing a Web Application
and is not being persisted for retrieval at a later time.

Google map URIs are not application state resources.  They are
just normal resources that are represented with dynamic content.

....Roy
Received on Sunday, 17 October 2010 23:14:21 GMT

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