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Re: Why not max/min-font-size? & extend them to other properties of sizes

From: Tab Atkins Jr. <jackalmage@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 17 Jun 2014 12:59:46 -0700
Message-ID: <CAAWBYDDwR=1-Q78XOms1iuo2KTCo6Woi0-QKpuecJagU+FDiOg@mail.gmail.com>
To: Gérard Talbot <www-style@gtalbot.org>
Cc: "Kseso?" <kseso9@gmail.com>, www-style list <www-style@w3.org>
On Tue, Jun 17, 2014 at 12:34 PM, Gérard Talbot <www-style@gtalbot.org> wrote:
> Le 2014-06-17 13:44, Tab Atkins Jr. a écrit :
>> I don't see a problem here. This lets authors set a font-size in
>> something useful but possibly variable, but ensure it doesn't get
>> smaller than, say, 16px.
>
> A preferred font size (for legibility, readability purposes) expressed in
> pixels depends on the pixel density. A preferred font size (for legibility,
> readability purposes) expressed in pixels relates to the pixel density. No?

No?  The px unit has nothing to do with the pixel density, and in any
case, we have no way of referring to the pixel density (besides
exhaustive binary search with MQs).

>>> How can a web author know the pixel density of my screen resolution? (eg
>>> 96DPI)
>>
>>
>> What relevance does this have?
>
>
> Let's say I use a 96DPI and a minimum font size (browser setting) set to
> 16px. If or when I increase pixel density of my device, then my minimum font
> size for reading, legibility will have to be increased proporitionnally to
> ensure the same legibility. Agreed?

No, 16px is always (approximately) the same size; it's an absolute
unit.  It does not depend on the pixel density of your device.  If it
did, all pages would have been broken for years already, since devices
have DPIs ranging from 72 to 300+.

~TJ
Received on Tuesday, 17 June 2014 20:00:33 UTC

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