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Re: [CSSWG][css-text-3] CSS3 Text Last Call Working Draft

From: fantasai <fantasai.lists@inkedblade.net>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 07:36:47 -0700
Message-ID: <53CD257F.6020805@inkedblade.net>
To: CE Whitehead <cewcathar@hotmail.com>, Koji Ishii <kojiishi@gluesoft.co.jp>, "www-style@w3.org" <www-style@w3.org>
On 05/28/2014 09:44 PM, CE Whitehead wrote:
> Hi, Fantasai, I have a few more comments -- mostly proofreading -- on "CSS3 Text" (http://dev.w3.org/csswg/css-text-3/)
> * * *
>
> 5, Par 5
> "CSS does not fully define where soft wrap opportunities occur, however some controls are provided to distinguish common
> variations. "
>
> { COMMENT:  should not these two sentences be separated/conjoined by a semi-colon? }
> =>
> "CSS does not fully define where soft wrap opportunities occur; however some controls are provided to distinguish common
> variations. "

Done.

> * * *
>
> 5.2; Under
> "break-all"
>
> 'In addition to word-break:normal soft wrap opportunities, lines may break between any two semantically-perceived letters
> (except where forbidden by the line-break property). Hyphenation is not applied. This option is used mostly in a context where
> the text is predominantly using CJK characters with few non-CJK excerpts and it is desired that the text be better distributed
> on each line."
>
> {COMMENT: The last sentence is awkward in English; the subject of "using" in "using CJK characters" is "text" but it really
> does not make sense to have the text using anything; the text is after all passive without someone making it up; also phrase
> "it is desired that text be better distributed on each line" is kind of vague I think; inserting "where" before this phrase
> makes it clearer IMO that it follows "this option is used" -- that it says where the option is used. }
> =>
> "In addition to word-break:normal soft wrap opportunities, lines may break between any two semantically-perceived letters
> (except where forbidden by the line-break property). Hyphenation is not applied. This option is used mostly in a context where
> the text consists predominantly of CJK characters with few non-CJK excerpts, and where it is desired that the text be better
> distributed on each line."

I took the first change. The second seemed a bit awkward to me.

> * * *
> 5.2
> Last par
>
> "When shaping scripts such as Arabic are allowed to break within words due to break-all, the characters must still be shaped
> as if the word were not broken."
> {COMMENT:  is shaping scripts" the most commonly used term to describe these types of scripts? If it is not a consistently
> used term in this context, it would be better if you said "cursive",  "when cursive scripts"
>
> =>
> "When cursive scripts such as Arabic are allowed to break within words due to break-all, the characters must still be shaped
> as if the word were not broken."

I'm doubtful that cursive is a superset of shaping, so leaving it as-is.
They are technically independent phenomena: for example, Greek Final
Sigma could have been a shaped glyph form of Greek Sigma. It simply
wasn't encoded that way in Unicode.

> * * *
> 6.1 auto 3rd par
>
> " Such an automatic hyphenation points within a word are ignored when it contains soft hyphens (&shy; or U+00AD.)"
> {COMMENT:  "an" is never used before a plural noun, such as "points"}
> =>
> " Such  automatic hyphenation points within a word are ignored when it contains soft hyphens (&shy; or U+00AD.)"

Good catch. Fixed.

> * * *
> 7.4 example
> {COMMENT: Should you cite 'al-Khansaa as the source for the Arabic lines? I don't know other examples you have cited; I happen
> to know these lines -- maybe it's best to leave the examples uncited, the way you have them.}

I think I agree with leaving them uncited. :) The content is not
important to us here, only the typography is.

> 7.4.4 Cursive Scripts
> "Justification must not introduce gaps between visually-perceived letters of cursive scripts such as Arabic. If it is able,
> the UA may translate space distributed to justification opportunities within a run of such visually-perceived letters into
> some form of cursive elongation for that run. It otherwise must assume that no justification opportunity exists between any
> pair of visually-perceived letters in cursive script. "
> {COMMENT on CONTENT: the traditional way I have seen Arabic letters elongated is that the line connecting them has been
> lengthened; this seems to be quite common.}

Indeed, it is quite common for "newspaper-printing" fonts such
as those used to typeset most books. For more calligraphic styles,
it's a bit more complicated, as the the Tasmeem example shows.

> * * *
> 8 Example 13
> "In the following example, word spacing is halved, but may expand if needed for text justification.
> p { word-spacing: -50%; }"
>
> {COMMENT: Fine; but I would like a bit more commenting; I assume that the "-" before "50%" means "minus";  thus do you insert
> "+" to indicate 150% word spacing?}

You can, if you want. In CSS negative numbers are represented
with a minus sign, and positive numbers are indicated with
either no sign or a plus sign. This does not need to be called
out here.

Let me know if these responses are acceptable!

~fantasai
Received on Monday, 21 July 2014 14:37:22 UTC

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