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RE: [css-animations] What is the format of the key string passed to CSSKeyframesRule.findRule/deleteRule ?

From: Greg Whitworth <gwhit@microsoft.com>
Date: Thu, 3 Apr 2014 00:41:39 +0000
To: Tab Atkins Jr. <jackalmage@gmail.com>, Sylvain Galineau <galineau@adobe.com>
CC: "<www-style@w3.org>" <www-style@w3.org>
Message-ID: <6c5b3f648bce4daaad6be35861dc81ab@DM2PR03MB400.namprd03.prod.outlook.com>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Tab Atkins Jr. [mailto:jackalmage@gmail.com]
> Sent: Friday, March 21, 2014 8:58 AM
> To: Sylvain Galineau
> Cc: <www-style@w3.org>
> Subject: Re: [css-animations] What is the format of the key string passed to
> CSSKeyframesRule.findRule/deleteRule ?
> 
> On Thu, Mar 20, 2014 at 6:21 PM, Sylvain Galineau <galineau@adobe.com>
> wrote:
> > I run in the following cross-browser issue while investigating the previous
> issue [1].
> >
> > The specification defined the value passed to these methods as a string
> with the following property:
> >
> > # The key must resolve to a number between 0 and 1, or the rule is
> ignored.
> >
> > And indeed, if you do findRule("1") or deleteRule("0.5"), IE dutifully
> finds/removes the 100% and 50% keyframes, respectively.
> >
> > No other browser does this, however. Gecko, WebKit and Blink all expect
> "100%" and "50%"
> >
> > To mitigate any compat issues, one possible compromise would be to
> require browsers to support both in the future.
> >
> > [1] http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/www-style/2014Mar/0498.html

> 
> Urf, IE followed the literal spec text, even when it was stupid, rather than
> objecting. :/  (Not that everyone else's "just implement what we think it
> really means, rather than objecting" strategy is any
> better.)

+1 on the aspect of UAs getting the spec updated if they deviate from the spec as the one of the main points of the spec is to follow it for interop between UAs. Not upgrading the spec kind of defeats the entire point of their existence.

> I'm fine with doubling up like this if necessary.  Do we need to be clear that
> browsers must be careful about float precision?  100% and 50% can be
> expressed exactly with a floating-point, but 10% can't be - how does IE react
> when passed ".1"?
> 
> ~TJ

Received on Thursday, 3 April 2014 00:42:10 UTC

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