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Re: css3-fonts: should not dictate usage policy with respect to origin

From: Glenn Adams <glenn@skynav.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2011 22:37:21 -0600
Message-ID: <BANLkTimsBQ-BtL1=SrgRKDQf8h+KUUF8tg@mail.gmail.com>
To: Sylvain Galineau <sylvaing@microsoft.com>
Cc: John Hudson <tiro@tiro.com>, "Levantovsky, Vladimir" <Vladimir.Levantovsky@monotypeimaging.com>, "liam@w3.org" <liam@w3.org>, StyleBeyondthePunchedCard <www-style@w3.org>, "public-webfonts-wg@w3.org" <public-webfonts-wg@w3.org>, "www-font@w3.org" <www-font@w3.org>, "Martin J." <duerst@it.aoyama.ac.jp>
On Tue, Jun 28, 2011 at 8:13 PM, Sylvain Galineau <sylvaing@microsoft.com>wrote:

>  It’s good that you’re not fixated on a particular objective but, fwiw,
> that is the exact perception you have created i.e. you are here to achieve
> your own ends and screw what others think. First, by appearing to show up
> for the purpose of formally objecting, as pointed out above. I don’t think
> it’s unreasonable for a relative stranger to get a different reception from
> as strong a signal as a FO vs. a regular, known contributor. Second, by
> using the word compromise a lot and never appearing to try finding one.
> Compromise starts with making a proposal but it doesn’t end there. It
> requires listening to feedback, addressing that feedback, adjusting the
> proposal iteratively through a two-way conversation. Instead, you made a
> proposal, almost immediately labeled it a compromise and generally stuck to
> it not only in the face of genuine issues but in the absence of any support
> for it from anyone else. Thus the message you sent was that your first
> proposal was also your final one i.e. ‘take it or leave it’. The overall
> substance and tone of your position being that you will not give anything
> away: either we bend, or you object.
>

In my initial comment in this thread [1], I expressed an objection to *any*
policy specified in css3-fonts w.r.t. mandating same-origin in the
css3-fonts spec.

[1] http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/www-style/2011Jun/0476.html

I then proposed alternative language at [2] that permitted a *should*
requirement in css3-fonts:

"If a user agent that makes normative use of this specification includes a
same-origin policy, then that policy, and the mechanisms it uses to enforce
that policy *should* apply to the loading of fonts via the @font-face
mechanism."

[2] http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/www-style/2011Jun/0478.html

I then offered a number of additional procedural options in [3] that would
remove our objection, including one that would move the existing
requirements to HTML5 but maintain them as stated:

"move same-origin requirements from WOFF and CSS3-FONTS to HTML5 or another
definition of a UA that actually performs access functions"

[3] http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/www-style/2011Jun/0488.html

I then offered another alternative expression (of the basic WOFF
restriction) in [4] that would mandate same origin restriction in existing
or new UAs that already support same origin:

"If the use of WOFF occurs in a context where same origin access constraints
are *already* present/supported, then that mechanism *must* be used to limit
access to WOFF fonts; otherwise, such a mechanism *should* be provided for
such use."

[4] http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/www-style/2011Jun/0612.html

I reiterated this position in a somewhat broader context at [5]:

"We believe the correct course for both of these specs is to NOT specify
*any* mandatory requirements related to access control, and to leave that up
to the definers of UA specs, such as HTML5. However, in the interest of
compromise, we are willing to drop the objection if the language is changed
to require same-origin only in the case that the UA already requires it (due
to other requirements)."

[5] http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/www-style/2011Jun/0668.html

It is quite clear to any casual reader that I have been attempting to find
language that would satisfy this group's position. I started with a hard
position (no reference to same-origin) and ended up with a much softer
position (permit conditional mandatory requirement to remain in these
specs).

If this is not an attempt to reach a compromise, then I don't know what is.

Now, what has the group's response been? It has been to repeatedly fail to
seriously consider any of these proposed alternatives, without much more
explanation than saying: i'm unreasonable, i'm inconsistent, i don't care
about the interests of authors, users, implementers, i'm trying to break the
group's progress, etc.

When the group actually takes up one of my proposed alternative and
considers it seriously, then perhaps I will feel the group has done due
diligence on this issue. But I do not get that sense at this time. All I get
is a sense that I'm an outsider whose position, because it appears to be
contrary to what the group had previously thought settled, is not worth
considering and should be dismissed out of hand.

For example,

   - why is it unacceptable to define these requirements solely in HTML5 or
   another (new) UA specification?
   - why is it unacceptable to allow existing UAs that do not implement same
   origin to choose to not implement same origin except to merely be compliant
   with a mandatory same origin requirement that applies *only* to @font-face
   fetches?

Now, if I may go back to the language cited by John Huston, viz.

<quote>
The Webfonts working group chartered deliverables include, in addition to
the WOFF spec, a

       WebFont conformance specification
       This specification will reference the font formats
       in existing use (OpenType, WOFF, SVG, and EOT), the
       font referencing and linking specifications (in both
       CSS and XML serialisations), access policies such
       as same-origin and CORS, and *define which* linking
       mechanisms, *policies* and formats *are required for
       compliance*. WOFF will be the required format for
       compliance, the others being optional. The Working
       Group will decide whether to make the formats and
       linking mechanisms normative references or, on the
       other hand, produce a document citable by other
       specifications (CSS3 Fonts, XSL, SVG) when claiming
       conformance.
</quote>

I do not see any mandate in this description for same origin. I see a
statement that the WG will "define which ... policies ... are required for
compliance". I do not see a charter derived mandate for a specific policy.
If the WG has previously made a determination to mandate universal
application of same-origin policy, then it need not have done so, at least
from the perspective of this charter language. That means that a proposal
such as Samsung's, to use a fractionally weaker policy, should be possible
as well.

I also note that the above charter foresees the possibility of "on the other
hand, produce a document citable by other specifications (CSS3 Fonts, XSL,
SVG) when claiming conformance". I indicated in my prior comments [3] that
Samsung could accept:

"move same-origin requirements from WOFF and CSS3-FONTS to a third "WebFonts
Conformance Specification"

Again, this proposal does not appear to have been seriously considered
either. Of course, if this last option were used, we would still like (but
not insist) on an exception for pre-existing, non-same-origin UIs as
expressed in [5] as cited above. But we could live with this scenario, and
it would give us our original desired position of moving such requirements
out of css3-fonts and woff specs.

I have offered a number of softer solutions to my original comment. I
consider these to be compromises on Samsung's part in order to reach some
form of closure. I suggest that instead of discussing this matter further in
this thread, that the respective groups go consider these proposals at their
face value and determine if a solution is possible that resolves our
objection and that can still meet the needs of the groups.

Regards,
Glenn


>  **
>
> *From:* Glenn Adams [mailto:glenn@skynav.com]
> *Sent:* Tuesday, June 28, 2011 5:13 PM
>
> *To:* Sylvain Galineau
> *Cc:* John Hudson; Levantovsky, Vladimir; liam@w3.org;
> StyleBeyondthePunchedCard; public-webfonts-wg@w3.org; www-font@w3.org;
> Martin J.
> *Subject:* Re: css3-fonts: should not dictate usage policy with respect to
> origin****
>
>  ** **
>
> Well Sylvain, you are at least consistent in mis-attributing incorrect
> intentions to the position I represent. To be clear:****
>
>    - Samsung has no interest in blocking the work of the WG, and fully
>    supports the group's work;****
>    - Samsung has no interest in preventing font authors or font providers
>    from protecting access to their intellectual property; we note there are
>    various ways of achieving content protection and digital rights management;
>    ****
>    - Samsung is not fixated on a specific result from the group, and is
>    willing to consider any reasonable option that addresses our concern;**
>    **
>    - Samsung believes the issue is whether an existing implementation of
>    @font-face that does not employ same origin can claim conformance to a
>    final, published REC that wishes to apply the same origin mandate to all
>    implementations, whether new or old; the issue of whether such an old
>    implementation is "experimental" or merely "early" is unrelated to our
>    concern, since it is desirable to (finally) have a complete and final
>    specification for @font-face that can be referenced by industry compliance
>    testing and compliance certification processes;****
>    - if the group can find a way to effectively address this concern, then
>    we will be happy to remove our objection;****
>
>  ** **
>
> G.****
>
> ** **
>
> On Tue, Jun 28, 2011 at 5:46 PM, Sylvain Galineau <sylvaing@microsoft.com>
> wrote:****
>
> Well, if we have fallen into ad-hominem – and your opening paragraph seems
> to indicate we have indeed - then I am confident the sum of all your
> positive and constructive contributions to this WG will prove you to be the
> innocent victim of my unfairness. ****
>
>  ****
>
> “Unless I observe a change in position” In other words, unless the group
> does what you want you will take action to block progress of their work.
> Given that you’ve made a single proposal and essentially ignored all
> substantive questions or issues that were raised, should you be surprised by
> the lack of progress ? You aim to force a group to comply with your demand
> for no other reason that you’ll formally object if it doesn’t. I give you
> credit for clarity, at least: you don’t waste any time pretending to care
> about anything or anyone else. It’s certainly one way to participate in the
> standard process but please, let’s at least have the decency to not act
> bothered when it causes some friction, as if formal objections never caused
> any heated exchanges. (Although the heated disagreements usually lead to the
> FO, not the other way around, so maybe this constitutes innovation).****
>
>  ****
>
> As a new draft would not force any existing implementations to support
> same-origin restrictions, your objection remains without basis. Same-origin
> support would only be required for a new implementation that also wants to
> conform with the latest draft.…until the next draft makes it non-conformant
> in some other way. Since working draft implementations are experimental,
> that is expected and normal. (At least for active CSSWG members and
> implementors).****
>
>  ****
>
> Last, since css3-fonts is under the CSSWG charter may I suggest your
> register your objection through the CSSWG mailing list at www-style@w3.org? Not everyone in the latter follows the Fonts WG mailing list. Thank you.
> ****
>
> *From:* public-webfonts-wg-request@w3.org [mailto:
> public-webfonts-wg-request@w3.org] *On Behalf Of *Glenn Adams
> *Sent:* Tuesday, June 28, 2011 3:18 PM****
>
>
> *To:* Sylvain Galineau
> *Cc:* John Hudson; Levantovsky, Vladimir; liam@w3.org;
> StyleBeyondthePunchedCard; public-webfonts-wg@w3.org; www-font@w3.org;
> Martin J.
> *Subject:* Re: css3-fonts: should not dictate usage policy with respect to
> origin****
>
>  ****
>
> Sylvain,****
>
>  ****
>
> This thread appears to be spiraling into ad hominem. It is clear that you
> believe yourself the self-appointed spokesman for the entire web in these
> matters, that you believe you can read my mind and announce my intentions,
> and that you must have the last word no matter what. It is also clear that
> you are not interested in considering any form of compromise to accommodate
> our position.****
>
>  ****
>
> It would be pointless to respond further, so, unless I observe a change in
> position, I will maintain Samsung's objection to mandating same-orign
> requirements in css3-fonts and/or woff for UAs that do not otherwise
> implement same origin access controls.****
>
>  ****
>
> Glenn****
>
>  ****
>
> On Tue, Jun 28, 2011 at 3:43 PM, Sylvain Galineau <sylvaing@microsoft.com>
> wrote:****
>
> My bad for taking a point you made earlier and extrapolating from that css3-fonts reference (“I would note, however, that as presently defined, HTML5 does require same-origin on web font resource access along with other resource types.” in http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/www-style/2011Jun/0668.html). But since HTML5 does **not** define any origin policy for fonts and you argue that is where it should be interoperably defined, how is that going to happen without raising the issue with the HTML WG ? As the spec is heading for Last Call it would seem important to raise the issue soon. (Although a formal objection would not indeed seem necessary if HTML5 does not require this, despite your original claim). ****
>
>  ****
>
> Given that your sole contribution to this mailing list and WG has been to
> show up to throw a sudden formal objection by making a series of incoherent
> and self-contradictory arguments – as if to see which one could stick,
> really - given that you are actively opposed to the consensus and goals of
> this WG, given that you haven’t even once bothered to show interest about
> the impact of your approach on the WG’s work, on other members, on the web,
> web authors or users, you have precious few grounds to expect the position
> you represent to be welcomed as a positive and meaningful contribution. In
> addition, given that you have persistently evaded or ignored others on those
> issues *they* care about, given that I have no concrete reason to believe
> as of yet that your goal is to contribute in a manner that is meaningful and
> positive for the work of the group, I have been as civil as I feel justified
> under the circumstances. Were you expecting a thank you note ?****
>
> *From:* Glenn Adams [mailto:glenn@skynav.com]
> *Sent:* Tuesday, June 28, 2011 11:26 AM
> *To:* Sylvain Galineau
> *Cc:* John Hudson; Levantovsky, Vladimir; liam@w3.org;
> StyleBeyondthePunchedCard; public-webfonts-wg@w3.org; www-font@w3.org;
> Martin J.
> *Subject:* Re: css3-fonts: should not dictate usage policy with respect to
> origin****
>
>  ****
>
>  ****
>
> On Tue, Jun 28, 2011 at 11:22 AM, Sylvain Galineau <sylvaing@microsoft.com>
> wrote:****
>
> In any case, I assume you will file a formal objection with all three WGs
> concerned. As HTML5 currently depends on css3-fonts to define this behavior
> and you clearly believe that to be incorrect, you will also object and
> demand that they define this behavior as part of HTML5, right ?****
>
>  ****
>
> Again, you are wrong. HTML5 only refers to css3-fonts once, in the
> following:****
>
>  ****
>
> *For fonts*****
>
> The origin <http://dev.w3.org/html5/spec/Overview.html#origin> of a
> downloadable Web font is equal to the origin<http://dev.w3.org/html5/spec/Overview.html#origin> of
> the absolute URL <http://dev.w3.org/html5/spec/Overview.html#absolute-url> used
> to obtain the font (after any redirects). [CSSFONTS]<http://dev.w3.org/html5/spec/Overview.html#refsCSSFONTS>
> ****
>
> This says nothing about using css3-fonts to define same origin behavior.**
> **
>
>  ****
>
> You know Slyvain, I don't know you, but I have not impugned your knowledge
> or reasonableness in this thread. On the other hand, every contribution of
> yours to this thread has been expressed to one degree or another in an
> ironic and frankly, a contemptuous tone. You should try being civil for a
> change.****
>
>  ****
>
> G.****
>
>  ****
>
>  ****
>
>  ****
>
>  ****
>
>  ****
>
>  ****
>
> ** **
>
Received on Wednesday, 29 June 2011 04:38:12 GMT

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