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Re: [css3-text] proposed value for text-align: no-justify

From: Simon Montagu <smontagu@smontagu.org>
Date: Tue, 19 Oct 2010 12:06:17 +0200
Message-ID: <4CBD6D99.4070209@smontagu.org>
To: Aryeh Gregor <AryehGregor@gmail.com>
Cc: timeless <timeless@gmail.com>, Boris Zbarsky <bzbarsky@mit.edu>, Christoph P├Ąper <christoph.paeper@crissov.de>, "www-style@w3.org list" <www-style@w3.org>
On 10/18/2010 08:10 PM, Aryeh Gregor wrote:
> On Mon, Oct 18, 2010 at 2:03 AM, Simon Montagu<smontagu@smontagu.org>  wrote:
>> That said, I don't agree with Aryeh either: in newspaper articles with
>> narrow justified columns hyphenation seems to be quite common. In printed
>> books it's much rarer, but it is used now and then.
>
> I'm not surprised.  Is it hyphenated with a makaf (U+5BE), i.e.,
> top-aligned on the line instead of center-aligned?  If so, does this
> imply CSS hyphenation needs to somehow support different hyphen
> characters for different languages?  How would that work?

The examples that I've seen look like U+05BE, yes.

For what it's worth there are a number of different Unicode characters 
with "hyphen" in the name and/or General Category "Punctuation, Dash". 
Some examples:

058A;ARMENIAN HYPHEN
1400;CANADIAN SYLLABICS HYPHEN
1806;MONGOLIAN TODO SOFT HYPHEN
30A0;KATAKANA-HIRAGANA DOUBLE HYPHEN

I don't know how any of these are used in practice, but I would assume 
that CSS hyphenation will need some way to specify the hyphenation 
character, if any (I believe that some scripts "hyphenate" just by 
breaking the word at the end of the line without any special character).
Received on Tuesday, 19 October 2010 10:06:54 GMT

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