W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > www-style@w3.org > September 2008

Re: [page][gcpm] should a named page start on a new page?

From: marbux <marbux@gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2008 10:13:34 -0700
Message-ID: <2c60d980809121013o313860c7n7a49f545d4f85925@mail.gmail.com>
To: "Philip TAYLOR" <P.Taylor@rhul.ac.uk>
Cc: www-style@w3.org
On Fri, Sep 12, 2008 at 8:45 AM, Philip TAYLOR <P.Taylor@rhul.ac.uk> wrote:

> marbux wrote:
>
>> On Thu, Sep 11, 2008 at 11:41 AM, HÃ¥kon Wium Lie <howcome@opera.com>
>> wrote:
>
>>> This is not possible in any current proposal. I can understand you
>>> don't want the blank to to have headers/footers, but do you really
>>> want the page not to be counted?
>>
>> More an issue of what the customer wants. During my years of printing
>> books for small press publishers, some customers wanted it one way,
>> some the other.  (My first career was as a typographer.)
>
> Can you explain what benefit your customers saw in
> having blank pages not counting towards "pages so far" ?
>
It's been decades, but I don't recall any truly reasoned positions
being advocated. One I recall insisted that pages without content
should not be counted for page numbering purposes because it would
mislead customers as to how many pages of content they were
purchasing.

It's not a position or convention I agreed with on grounds other than
that it was the customer's book, not mine. I.e., "the customer is
always right."

Can you cite any instance of
> a Western-culture book that does not adhere to this

Not off the top of my head. I do recall a specific work that we
produced for the Idaho Historical Society, but don't recall the title.
In that case, a freshly-hatched graphical designer was calling the
shots. Bottom line: some people are traditionalists; others rebel
against tradition.

I'll stress that I am not advocating for books being done this way,
only pointing out that they sometimes are, hence the use case for the
needed flexibility. My personal view is that the more graphical design
draws attention away from the information in a book, the poorer the
graphical design. So I favor the traditional layout the reader is
accustomed to.

Best regards,

Paul E. Merrell, J.D. (Marbux)

-- 
Universal Interoperability Council
<http:www.universal-interop-council.org>
Received on Friday, 12 September 2008 17:14:09 GMT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.2.0+W3C-0.50 : Monday, 27 April 2009 13:55:12 GMT