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RE: Proposal of @ua

From: Alan Gresley <alan1@azzurum.com>
Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2007 11:52:04 -0700
To: Brad Kemper <brkemper@comcast.net>
cc: www-style@w3.org
Message-ID: <20071126115204.34b83c2f3c9bef00757a2c62c0fb7450.b48baef406.wbe@email.secureserver.net>

Brad Kemper wrote:

<snipped all over>

> Honestly, I imagine it would be more likely to have a positive effect  
> for IE, Gecko, Webkit, and Opera, since that is who people are  
> writing CSS hacks for mostly these days in order to try to ensure the  
> best rendering for the widest numbers.


This is where your argument keeps on going and at the same time falls apart. My CSS site (see the signature line) renders the same in IE7, Gecko, Webkit, and Opera and almost any other browser. I use one hack for IE7 to show my external link markers. I use 12 hacks for IE6 and IE5.5 since I have the pages in quirksmode for them. Maybe it has a basic layout but I will never hack for a good browser even though I know how. On my site especially the test pages are some IE gremlins that you may be facing. Well worth a browse through.

You have often suggested that you need to hack because some browser doesn't support a CSS3 feature and you need to fix the nonsupporting browser up. Surely you must be coding for the year circa 2010 instead of now.


> I also think that the sort of author that would use advanced CSS3 is  
> more likely to be aware of the issues and write that CSS in a way you  
> would not object to, and to set a good example for future authors.


Would this good example employ the use of a @ua?

Kind Regards, Alan
http://css.class.com/
Received on Monday, 26 November 2007 18:52:24 GMT

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