W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > www-style@w3.org > May 2004

Re: CSS: %% length unit. Proposal. Some clarifications.

From: Andrew Fedoniouk <news@terrainformatica.com>
Date: Thu, 13 May 2004 16:27:45 -0700
Message-ID: <001b01c43941$e6a81890$1902000a@AFedoniouk>
To: "David Woolley" <david@djwhome.demon.co.uk>, <www-style@w3.org>

Hi, David,

These sites are using three column layout:
http://www.w3.org/
http://www.alistapart.com/

And this site does not as it is optimized for incremental rendering.
http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-CSS2/

Any layout which use columns (implemented in any way but not frames) is by
HTML nature cannot be rendered incrementally.

I mean "incremental rendering is completely frustrated" is not about tables
only.
There are already too many ways to break "incrementality" by using CSS.
Why then be shy about margin-top:auto?

Let it be a designer responsibility to decide what kind of optimization
he/she need.

There are a lot of sites which need to have finite x/y layout optimisation .
There are plenty of others which follow classic HTML metaphor : unlimited
tape of paper. CSS should serve both.

In my own honest opinion.

Andrew Fedoniouk.
http://terrainformatica.com


> > Most of sites are using sort of
> > left-bar<|>content<|>right-bar layout these days.
>
> Many such sites are designed for page descriptions languages and ought
> to be using them, rather than HTML.  They often use table without
> fixed layout, so don't render until I've given up waiting for them!
>
> >
> > left-bar appear then content then right-bar...
> >
> > UA always knows when second step (vertical adjustment) is needed while
> > loading document.
>
> You need to know the final vertical height of the content before anything
> is rendered if you are to avoid a re-rendering artefacts.  As noted above,
> that is often achieved by auto-layout tables, but has the effect that
> incremental rendering is completely frustrated.
>
> There are also applications in which infinite pages are generated
dynamically.
>
Received on Thursday, 13 May 2004 19:28:22 GMT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.2.0+W3C-0.50 : Monday, 27 April 2009 13:54:30 GMT