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Re: :here for Links

From: Ernest Cline <ernestcline@mindspring.com>
Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2003 19:33:22 -0500
To: www-style@w3.org
Message-ID: <3E889802.14736.554777@localhost>

On 31 Mar 2003 at 17:09, Daniel wrote:

> This just does not work with user stylesheets...

Considering that the paragraph you quoted dealt only with why there is no 
need for :here from the viewpoint of author stylesheets, your reply is 
hardly responsive, especially since the rest of my note dealt with :here 
with respect to user stylesheets. If you would care to comment on what I 
said about :here from the viewpoint of user stylesheets, I quote it below.
I am willing to be convinced that :here is a good idea, but I haven't seen 
any supporting reasons given as to why it would be.

On 31 Mar 2003 at 9:20, Ernest wrote:

> How about a document user, tho? The main reason I can see for being 
> interested in :here would be as a way of indicating that a document will not 
> have to be retreived and hence could be rendered without a new download. 
> However in that context, a pseudoclass of :cached to indicate that status 
> would be more relevant. 
> [snip]
> 
> Altho I can see the utility of a pseudo-class such as :cached, unless one can 
> present a reason why a user might desire :here beyond because they might 
> desire it, I will remain strongly opposed to adding :here to CSS. There are 
> all sorts of neat things that could be added.

Just in case the above was not clear enough, let me restate my point here.  
I agree that for a user (who has no control over the format that the author 
has chosen for his local URLs) [href^="#'} cannot serve as an adequate 
substitute for the proposed :here.  However, I have not seen a reason 
presented why a user would care about differntiating between links in the 
current page and those that are not.  Unless someone can come up with a 
reason other than the user might think that its a neat idea, I see this as 
being something that would add bloat to CSS without purpose. One neat idea 
isn't too hard to implement, but one hundred are, and the best way to avoid 
making the standard too bloated is to say no to new features unless a 
compelling reason is presented for them.  The one reason I could think of 
why a user could find :here useful is better addressed by the :cached 
pseudo-class I proposed above, as a distinction that I can see as being 
important to the user is whether the link can be accessed offline or not.
Received on Monday, 31 March 2003 19:32:59 GMT

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