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Re: :first-line

From: Sigurd Lerstad <sigler@bredband.no>
Date: Tue, 25 Feb 2003 05:22:40 +0100
Message-ID: <013201c2dc85$890d0c50$7d1273d5@mmstudio>
To: <www-style@w3.org>


I don't get this post, did you just repeat my question or did you answer it?
:)

I didn't notice the difference in CSS2 and CSS3, but I (now) need to know if
the behavior is supposed to be different on CSS2 and CSS3. What CSS2 has, is
what seems the most intuitive to me. Is the change in CSS3 a mistake or have
they changed the behavior on :first-line from CSS2 to CSS3 ?

thanks,

--
Sigurd Lerstad

> Sigurd wrote on Sunday, February 23, 2003 at 9:50:23 PM:
>
> > Note that p::first-line is inside the span element, this means that
> > properties set on the p::first-line overrides properties set on the
> > span.
>
> This is opposite of the text in CSS2:
> http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-CSS2/selector.html#first-line-pseudo
>
>   <P><P:first-line><SPAN class="test"> This is a somewhat long HTML
>   paragraph that will </SPAN></P:first-line><SPAN class="test"> be
>   broken into several lines.</SPAN> The first line will be identified
>   by a fictional tag sequence. The other lines will be treated as
>   ordinary lines in the paragraph.</P>
>
> Compare with the text from CSS3 Selectors:
> http://www.w3.org/TR/2001/CR-css3-selectors-20011113/#first-line
>
>   <p><span class="test"><p::first-line> This is a
>   somewhat</p::first-line></span><p::first-line> long HTML paragraph
>   that</p::first-line> will be broken into several lines. The first
>   line will be identified by a fictional tag sequence. The other lines
>   will be treated as ordinary lines in the paragraph.</p>
>
> Following CSS2's example, I would expect CSS3 to say something like
> this:
>
>   <p><p::first-line><span class="test">This is a somewhat</span> long
>   HTML paragraph that</p::first-line> will be broken into several
>   lines. The first line will be identified by a fictional tag
>   sequence. The other lines will be treated as ordinary lines in the
>   paragraph.</p>
>
> I can't fault the browsers since they seem to be following CSS2. Is
> there a reason for the change, or was it a simple mistake? Does the
> order in a *fictional* tag sequence even matter?
Received on Monday, 24 February 2003 07:19:33 GMT

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