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Re: :first-line

From: John Lewis <lewi0371@mrs.umn.edu>
Date: Sat, 22 Feb 2003 23:09:37 -0600
Message-ID: <13261467339.20030222230937@cda.mrs.umn.edu>
To: www-style@w3.org

Sigurd wrote on Sunday, February 23, 2003 at 9:50:23 PM:

> Note that p::first-line is inside the span element, this means that
> properties set on the p::first-line overrides properties set on the
> span.

This is opposite of the text in CSS2:
http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-CSS2/selector.html#first-line-pseudo

  <P><P:first-line><SPAN class="test"> This is a somewhat long HTML
  paragraph that will </SPAN></P:first-line><SPAN class="test"> be
  broken into several lines.</SPAN> The first line will be identified
  by a fictional tag sequence. The other lines will be treated as
  ordinary lines in the paragraph.</P>

Compare with the text from CSS3 Selectors:
http://www.w3.org/TR/2001/CR-css3-selectors-20011113/#first-line

  <p><span class="test"><p::first-line> This is a
  somewhat</p::first-line></span><p::first-line> long HTML paragraph
  that</p::first-line> will be broken into several lines. The first
  line will be identified by a fictional tag sequence. The other lines
  will be treated as ordinary lines in the paragraph.</p>

Following CSS2's example, I would expect CSS3 to say something like
this:

  <p><p::first-line><span class="test">This is a somewhat</span> long
  HTML paragraph that</p::first-line> will be broken into several
  lines. The first line will be identified by a fictional tag
  sequence. The other lines will be treated as ordinary lines in the
  paragraph.</p>

I can't fault the browsers since they seem to be following CSS2. Is
there a reason for the change, or was it a simple mistake? Does the
order in a *fictional* tag sequence even matter?

-- 
John
Received on Sunday, 23 February 2003 00:10:29 GMT

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