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Re: CSS3 box height %

From: Jens Meiert <jens.meiert@erde3.com>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2003 15:23:18 +0200 (MEST)
To: www-style@w3.org
Message-ID: <3424.1060867398@www43.gmx.net>

Unfortunately and after reconsidering this topic I don't see any advantage
of 'height: auto;' since it IMO complies with any elements default value (if
it is not, it should be, I suggest).

If you don't know the height of an element, it doesn't make any sense to me
to waste efforts to define it as 'auto' -- otherwise (if you know the
height), declare it. And another question: Wouldn't it be legal to write 'height:
auto;' everywhere, deking a kind of knowledge and valid source, thus 'diluting'
the whole document...? And what happens when a UA renders a page overflowing
with 'auto' values?

Excuse my ironic and/or provoking language as well as repeating the entire
post...


 Jens.



> > > <div id="parent" style="height: auto">
> > >   <div id="child1" style="height: 10em" />
> > >   <div id="child2" style="height: 70%" />
> > >   <div id="child3" style="height: 70%" />
> > > </div>
> > 
> > Boris -- What result do you expect here?
> 
> At the moment, I expect that child1 will be 10em tall, child2 and child3
> will
> be 0 tall (since they have no content), and parent will be 10em tall. 
> Adding
> content to child2 and child3 would change that, of course.
> 
> There is no obviously "correct" rendering here, though.
> 
> > A common sense result IMO is an
> > overall 10em height, even rendering the both 70% declared child elements
> as
> > 10em, and thus making all definitions expect 'height: 10em' obsolete.
> 
> I'm not sure what you mean here.  Please explicitly state what the height
> of
> each element should be (I even gave them IDs for easy reference).
> 
> > For me, the
> > example implies an inconsequent use of the height property (resp. its
> > values), because contradictory.
> 
> This is a very common example in the real world, unfortunately.
> 
> >    <a>
> >      <b1> 1 </b1>
> >      <b2> 2 </b2>
> >      <b3> 3 </b3>
> >    </a>
> > 
> >    * { display: block; }
> >    a { height: 500px; }
> >    b1 { height: 75%; }
> >    b2, b3 { height: auto; }
> > 
> > ...and thus clarifying the only legal way to mix relative with absolute
> > values? <b1 /> would obviously be 375px high, while allowing <b2 /> and
> <b3 /
> > > to
> > share its space.
> 
> This already works that way (since <a> is not auto-height),
> 
> Boris
> -- 
> Computer, n: 
>    A device to speed up and automate errors
> 


-- 
Jens Meiert

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Received on Thursday, 14 August 2003 09:23:25 GMT

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