W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > www-international@w3.org > July to September 2010

Re: Updated article: Who uses Unicode?

From: Martin J. Dürst <duerst@it.aoyama.ac.jp>
Date: Tue, 07 Sep 2010 09:50:23 +0900
Message-ID: <4C858C4F.4050702@it.aoyama.ac.jp>
To: Richard Ishida <ishida@w3.org>
CC: "'Gunnar Bittersmann'" <gunnar@bittersmann.de>, www-international@w3.org
Hello Richard,

The article says, at the end:

"You can add a logo to your page provided by the Unicode Consortium if 
it validates as UTF-8 using the W3C validator."

It would be really good if you were giving an actionable link, rather 
than putting the reader off by an apparent "there is something 
somewhere, go search for it yourself" attitude.

Also, you might mention that some famous Web frameworks, in particular 
Ruby on Rails (http://rubyonrails.org/) come with everything set up for 
UTF-8 out of the box. (I don't now about Web frameworks based on other 
programming languages.)

On 2010/09/06 19:35, Richard Ishida wrote:
> I think it's being slightly more precise than actually needed, but I changed the text to
>
> It is sometimes assumed that Unicode encodings are popular "behind the scenes" but rarely used on the pages of major Web sites.
>
> And added a note:
>
> In this article, Unicode is short for a Unicode encoding.

Why not use the wording that I proposed in my mail yesterday?

Regards,   Martin.


> Cheers,
> RI
>
> ============
> Richard Ishida
> Internationalization Lead
> W3C (World Wide Web Consortium)
>
> http://www.w3.org/International/
> http://rishida.net/
>
>
>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Gunnar Bittersmann [mailto:gunnar@bittersmann.de]
>> Sent: 04 September 2010 12:59
>> To: Richard Ishida
>> Cc: www-international@w3.org
>> Subject: Updated article: Who uses Unicode?
>>
>> “It it sometimes assumed that Unicode is a popular encoding "behind the
>> scenes" but rarely used on the home pages of major Web sites.”
>>
>> <tongue-in-cheek>
>> Shouldn’t that sentence better read:
>> It it sometimes assumed that Unicode is a popular encoding "behind the
>> scenes" but this is never the case. Unicode ist not a character encoding.
>> Unicode is a character set and is used on all Web pages of the world.
>> [http://www.w3.org/International/questions/qa-doc-charset]
>> </tongue-in-cheek>
>>
>> Other W3C i8n articles try to make clear the difference between
>> character set and character encoding, but the wording used in this
>> article kind of undermines this.
>>
>> Suggestion: Replace "Unicode" with "a Unicode encoding" throughout the
>> article.
>>
>> And replace "home pages" with "Web pages" or (better) delete and make it:
>> It it sometimes assumed that Unicode encodings are popular "behind the
>> scenes" but rarely used on major Web sites.
>>
>> Regards,
>> Gunnar
>>
>> No virus found in this incoming message.
>> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
>> Version: 9.0.851 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3110 - Release Date: 09/03/10
>> 19:34:00
>
>
>

-- 
#-# Martin J. Dürst, Professor, Aoyama Gakuin University
#-# http://www.sw.it.aoyama.ac.jp   mailto:duerst@it.aoyama.ac.jp
Received on Tuesday, 7 September 2010 00:51:20 GMT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.2.0+W3C-0.50 : Tuesday, 7 September 2010 00:51:22 GMT