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Re: The ability to turn off animations in browsers

From: Hidvégi Gábor <gabor@hidvegi.net>
Date: Tue, 11 Jun 2013 10:22:35 +0200
Message-ID: <97BCB6D0F41845EB81F6628ED510426F@gab>
To: <www-html@w3.org>
The browser vendors could also benefit from this ability. Last week I read 
this article which gave me the idea:
http://blogs.windows.com/ie/b/ie/archive/2013/06/05/internet-explorer-10-is-the-most-energy-efficient-browser-on-windows-8.aspx

Many people care about the environment, just think about the ones who buy 
electric/hybrid cars; turning off animations would only need a few 
clicks/taps. The first browser vendor who could define its product as 
"green" would be a great opportunity. For example Mozilla / phone operators 
could turn this feature on by default on their low cost/slow hardware mobile 
devices to offer even more power.

Gábor Hidvégi


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "David Woolley" <forums@david-woolley.me.uk>
To: <www-html@w3.org>
Cc: "Hidvégi Gábor" <gabor@hidvegi.net>
Sent: Tuesday, June 11, 2013 9:21 AM
Subject: Re: The ability to turn off animations in browsers


> David Woolley wrote:
>
>> attention of jaded users, at a time when hardware is getting better and 
>> better at power management.  Low end gaming GPUs can have a power 
>> consumption change of 60 watts between a static picture and maximum 
>> animation, and CPUs may also vary by about that much.
>>
>
> Some more subtle ways in which they increase power consumption is that 
> they force the continual updating of PCs to more powerful ones, which 
> means that the baseline power consumption tends to stay the same, rather 
> than taking advantage of increases in the processing power to electrical 
> power ratio and actually results in higher peak power consumptions. Also 
> there is an energy cost (which could exceed the running cost) in the 
> manufacturing of the ever more powerful PCs needed to continue to obtain 
> the same quality of editorial content.
>
> -- 
> David Woolley
> Emails are not formal business letters, whatever businesses may want.
> RFC1855 says there should be an address here, but, in a world of spam,
> that is no longer good advice, as archive address hiding may not work.
>
> 
Received on Tuesday, 11 June 2013 08:23:00 UTC

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