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Re: separator/seperator Re: About XHTML 2.0

From: Orion Adrian <orion.adrian@gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 May 2005 19:18:24 -0400
Message-ID: <abd6c80105052216187db58ef9@mail.gmail.com>
To: www-html@w3.org

The issue I have with this approach is that it creates issues with sub-sections.


Let's assume I have a document that only has two levels of text.
<section>
  <h>Heading 1</h>
  <p></p>
  <section>
    <!-- this is a level 2 section -->
    <p></p>
    <seperator /> <!-- represents a perspective shift. -->
    <p></p>
  </section>
</section>

<section>
  <h>Heading 1</h>
  <p></p>
  <section>
    <!-- this is a level 2 section -->
    <section><p></p></section>
    <section><p></p></section>
  </section>
</section>

The two paragraphs are now represented by their own sections, which
produces a problem, but it may not be obvious.

Assume that there are many sections like that and my stylesheet styles
different levels of sections differently. I've now messed that up. I
didn't intend for them to be downshifted in priority.

Section is very useful and I love what it does for organization and I
love not having to go back to h1, h2, etc. But it's not complete. You
still need this lightweight seperator. It's been used in writing for a
very long time.

For section to work appropriately, text must be able to be placed in
the exact section level that it is meant to be placed. This means that
section can't be used for anything other than creating the overarching
organization of the document. Any other uses prevents proper styling
and filtering.

If I wanted only the text from section level 1 to section level 3 I
don't want two block of text to disappear just because I need to
seperate them to communicate a perspective shift for example.

Orion Adrian


On 5/23/05, i <i@orz.cc> wrote:
> I have never been in a situation that I need <hr/> or <separator/> because section elements can totally replace it.
> 
> For example:
> 
>   Fragment A
>   <separator/>
>   Fragment B
> 
> It means there is/must be a structual or semantic difference between the two sets of fragments, and then:
> 
>   <section>
>    <h>Heading A</h>
>    Fragment A
>   </section>
>   <section>
>    <h>Heading B</h>
>    Fragment B
>   </section>
> 
> The section-h structure seems to me always make sense. In other words, proper headings must have existed at the time you want to separete fragment from another fragment with a certain semantic reason.
> 
> --
> Ai
> http://orz.cc/
> 
>
Received on Sunday, 22 May 2005 23:18:29 UTC

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