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Re: Object and New Insert Code Element

From: Arthur Wiebe <webmaster@awiebe.com>
Date: Thu, 10 Apr 2003 13:55:56 -0400
Message-ID: <3E95B02C.3060403@awiebe.com>
To: Etan Wexler <ewexler@stickdog.com>, www-html@w3.org
I never heard of XInclude before and I think it pretty much takes care 
of everything. I no longer propose <insert> and realize that it would 
not be as good as I thought. But then is XInclude going to be supported 
in XHTML2?

Etan Wexler wrote:

>Arthur Wiebe wrote to <mailto:www-html@w3.org> on 9 April 2003 in "Object
>and New Insert Code Element" (<mid:3E94AD95.3030305@awiebe.com>):
>
>  
>
>>I've been trying for the longest time to insert code from an external
>>file onto another page for a long time. Using <object> does not work to
>>good. SSI is not supported and I even tried Flash.
>>    
>>
>
>It's not clear what you want to do. Are you trying to reference and embed a
>distinct resource or integrate content into the document proper? Do you
>care?
>
>And have you thought about discussing server shortcomings with your system
>administrator? That seems the logical first step to m
>
>
>  
>
>>I say one thing XHTML 2 desperately needs is a new element called
>>insert. We would use it sort of like object except this would be for
>>inserting code, (not images or applications!) from an external file
>>source. This is something myself and many others NEED.
>>    
>>
>
>What makes you think that 'object' is not for embedding textual code? What
>makes you think that user agent designers will be any quicker in
>implementing your proposal than implementing the existing 'object' element
>type?
>
>  
>
>>It would be so fun to be able to do this.
>>
>><insert data-"http://domain.com/directory/filename.ext"
>>type-"application/xhtml+xml"/> or
>><insert data-"http://domain.com/directory/filename.ext"
>>type-"application/xhtml+xml">Your browser does not support XHTML 2.0.
>>Sorry.</insert>
>>    
>>
>
>This is wrong, and on so many levels. At the most elementary, you need
>well-formedness; replace each hyphen-minus ("-", U+002D) with an equals sign
>("=", U+003D). Don't think of HTTP as a file system; it is not. Your
>ostensible help and information for the user is both rude and liable to be
>incorrect. There are many reasons why a user agent might not retrieve and
>embed the referenced resource, ranging from network congestion to user
>configuration. The content should be effective alternative text. The Web
>Accessibility Initiative has plenty of guiding material freely available on
>the matter. [TOO-LAZY-FOR-PROPER-REFERENCE]
>
>The 'insert' element type proposal needs far more justification if it is to
>proceed.
>
>  
>
Received on Thursday, 10 April 2003 13:55:58 GMT

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