Re: HTML Streaming

Albertfine@aol.com
Mon, 25 Aug 1997 09:26:52 -0400 (EDT)


From: Albertfine@aol.com
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 1997 09:26:52 -0400 (EDT)
Message-ID: <970825092650_465514055@emout06.mail.aol.com>
To: www-html@w3.org
cc: jptxs@idt.net
Subject: Re: HTML Streaming

jptxs@idt.net (jptxs) wrote:

>>The compiled HTML file would allow the browser to view the HTML file as it
is
>>downloaded. For example, the title tag would be placed first. My streaming 
>>HTML protocols are very early in development and I would appreciate any
help.
>
>call me silly, but don't most HTML files already make some of themselves
>visible during the downloading process.  granted, not in any smooth
>fashion--but, unless you have something pretty fancy going on, stuff pops
>up as it comes down the pipe.  

You give the problem very little credit. MSIE actually got press for 
displaying an image less version of the HTMl file first. The time it takes to

display a HTML file is a factor especially with ever increasing connection 
speeds. Their has been little effort on the part of file format protocols to 
have what is displayed sent first.

>also, speaking practically, the amount of pages with advertising at the top
>is on the rise and the animated banners don't load very quicky on a 28.8 or
>lower connection.  if the streaming implies that things would display from
>the top down (head elements, followed by a sequencial display of
>body/frameset elements) a good number of people would be stuck looking at
>exactly what they didn't come for waiting for what they did.  something
>that may be simple HTML text hat may have loaded sans images more quickly
>than if it had been done in a streaming fashion.

You've found me out. I work for Double Click :)

>BTW--can you point to an example where the head, or at least the TITLE
>element is *not* at the top?  i can't say i've eveer seen one...

The title tag is a very simple example. A good way to look at this is "what
is displayed, send first. What is not displayed, stick at the bottom." I also
have several specifications to give more control over how and when the 
browser displays the HTML file. Again, this is still very early in 
development.

Albert Fine