Re: microsoftisms after netscapeisms ?

Albert Lunde (Albert-Lunde@nwu.edu)
Mon, 15 Jan 1996 08:40:31 -0600 (CST)


Message-Id: <199601151440.AA058436831@lulu.acns.nwu.edu>
Subject: Re: microsoftisms after netscapeisms ?
To: www-html@w3.org
Date: Mon, 15 Jan 1996 08:40:31 -0600 (CST)
In-Reply-To: <Pine.A32.3.91.960116001622.26664A-100000@zeppo.nepean.uws.edu.au> from "Robert Hazeltine" at Jan 16, 96 00:21:33 am
From: Albert-Lunde@nwu.edu (Albert Lunde)

> > The lowest common denominator is now HTML 2.0, which defines in 
> > toe-curling detail the consensus of the state of HTML in around August 94.
> > If you want to know what is the lowest common denominator, look there.
> 
> May I ask when this passed from being a proposed spec to a fully fledged one?

RFC 1866 is dated Nov 95. That's when HTML 2.0 went from being an
Internet Draft to a standards-track RFC. I think the official
status is now "proposed standard". And in practical terms, very
little is likely to change in the 2.0 spec but corrections of
typos and minor editoral errors. (From some points of view,
not much had changed in the 6-9 months before that, though some
important SGML issues were addressed.)

Internet-drafts are just working papers, and expire in six months.
They don't have any fixed meaning as standards, though one can
argue that they mean something in tracing the history and intentions
of a IETF working group. (And CERN/w3.org has a history outside
the IETF process.)