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The l element

From: John Lewis <lewi0371@mrs.umn.edu>
Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2003 19:50:48 -0500
Message-ID: <6185856166.20030416195048@cda.mrs.umn.edu>
To: www-html-editor@w3.org

I think the definition of the l element should read something more
like this:

    The l element represents a semantic line of text (e.g., a line of
    verse or a line of computer code). It is intended as a structured
    replacement for the br element.

    When visually represented, the l element should start on a new
    line and have a line break at the end. Whether the line should
    wrap or not depends on styling properties of the element.

Which is in my opinion much clearer.

It's especially important to separate the current paragraph
(reproduced below), which talks about what the l element is as well as
how it should be visually rendered in one breath. That's a mistake
because it leads people to believe that the l element is just a
renamed, slightly different version of the br element, when in reality
it's fundamentally different.

Here is the current definition:

    The l element contains a sub-paragraph that represents a sinle
    line of text. It is intended as a structured replacement for the
    br element. It contains a piece of text that when visually
    represented should start on a new line, and have a line break at
    the end. Whether the line should wrap or not visually depends on
    styling properties of the element.

-- 
John Lewis
Received on Wednesday, 16 April 2003 20:51:06 GMT

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