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Editorial comment on Understanding document

From: Bailey, Bruce <Bailey@Access-Board.gov>
Date: Fri, 18 Jun 2010 13:36:25 -0400
Message-ID: <23EB0B5A59FF804E9A219B2C4EF3AE3D01A73579@Access-Exch.Access-Board.gov>
To: "Ben Caldwell" <caldwell@trace.wisc.edu>, "Michael Cooper" <cooper@w3.org>
Cc: <wai-wcag-editor@w3.org>
At:

http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/conformance.html#uc-levels-hea
d

 

We have:

 

*         whether the Success Criterion is essential (in other words, if
the Success Criterion isn't met, then even assistive technology can't
make content accessible)

*         whether it is possible to satisfy the Success Criterion for
all Web sites and types of content that the Success Criteria would apply
to (e.g., different topics, types of content, types of Web technology)

*         whether the Success Criterion requires skills that could
reasonably be achieved by the content creators (that is, the knowledge
and skill to meet the Success Criteria could be acquired in a week's
training or less)

*         whether the Success Criterion would impose limits on the "look
& feel" and/or function of the Web page. (limits on function,
presentation, freedom of expression, design or aesthetic that the
Success Criteria might place on authors)

*         whether there are no workarounds if the Success Criteria is
not met

 

I just noticed now that the parentheticals are all slightly different in
style.   One has "e.g.", one says "that is" (which I think is equivalent
to the "in other words" used by first bullet).  The fourth bulleted item
has a period before the parenthesis (but still no capitalization).  My
personal preference would be that these are all converted to real
sentences (i.e., capitalize, and end each with a period), but I don't
think that's style.  So, given that, and the fact you eschew proper
typographical quotation marks, here's my suggested edits:

 

*         whether the Success Criterion is essential (in other words, if
the Success Criterion isn't met, then even assistive technology can't
make content accessible)

*         whether it is possible to satisfy the Success Criterion for
all Web sites and types of content that the Success Criteria would apply
to (for example, different topics, types of content, types of Web
technology)

*         whether the Success Criterion requires skills that could
reasonably be achieved by the content creators (in other words, the
knowledge and skill to meet the Success Criteria could be acquired in a
week's training or less)

*         whether the Success Criterion would impose limits on the "look
& feel" and/or function of the Web page (in other words, limits on
function, presentation, freedom of expression, design or aesthetic that
the Success Criteria might place on authors)

*         whether there are no workarounds if the Success Criteria is
not met

 

 
Received on Friday, 18 June 2010 17:33:08 GMT

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