W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > wai-eo-editors@w3.org > February 2010

Re: Topics for Web Accessibility Presentations and Training

From: Andrew Arch <andrew@w3.org>
Date: Thu, 25 Feb 2010 17:08:55 +0000
Message-ID: <4B86AEA7.1030800@w3.org>
To: Sharron Rush <srush@knowbility.org>
CC: wai-eo-editors@w3.org
Hi Sharron,

Thanks for your efforts on this - it's giving me a lot to work with. 
Just a question for clarification - some of the Topics (e.g. 4 - 
Promoting) have different material in the DOC file from the HTML file. 
Which version should I take as the preferred one to work from?

Cheers, Andrew


Sharron Rush wrote:
> Hi Andrew,
> 
> Sorry for the delay on this...I can not get the html draft to validate 
> and the error seems to be in the template...
> 
> "Sorry, I am unable to validate this document because on line *111* it 
> contained one or more bytes that I cannot interpret as utf-8 (in other 
> words, the bytes found are not valid values in the specified Character 
> Encoding). Please check both the content of the file and the character 
> encoding indication.  The error was: utf8 "\xBB" does not map to Unicode."
> 
> I have attached the Word doc with track changes and the corresponding 
> html.  Let me know what's next and again, sorry for the delay.
> 
> Best,
> Sharron
> 
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Sharron Rush |  Executive Director  |  www.Knowbility.org 
> <http://www.knowbility.org/> |  512 305-0310
> /Equal access to technology for people with disabilities/
> 
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
>     * Skip to content <#main>
>     * | Change text size or colors </WAI/changedesign.html>
> 
> W3C <http://www.w3.org/>Web Accessibility initiative 
> <http://www.w3.org/WAI/>
> 
> WAI: Strategies, guidelines, resources to make the Web accessible to 
> people with disabilities
> 
> 
>     Site Navigation
> 
> W3C Home <http://www.w3.org/>
> 
> Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) Home </WAI/>
> 
>    1. Introducing Accessibility <../../../../gettingstarted/Overview.html>
>    2. Guidelines & Techniques <../../../../guid-tech.html>
>    3. Managing Accessibility <../../../../managing.html>
>          1. Policy Resources <../../../../policy-res.html>
>          2. Business Case <../../../../bcase/Overview.html>
>          3. Implementing <../../../../implementing.html>
>          4. Developing Training <../../../../train.html>
>                1. Presentations <../../../../presentations/Overview.php>
>                2. Planning Training [Draft] <Overview.html>
>                      1.  Topics to Present
>                      2. Examples <scenarios.html>
>                      3. Tips for Presenters <prep.html>
>          5. Technical Papers <../../../../techpapers.html>
>    4. Evaluating Accessibility <../../../../eval/Overview.html>
>    5. WAI Groups <../../../../groups.html>
>    6. About WAI <../../../../about-links.html>
> 
>     * WAI Site Map <../../../../sitemap.html>
>     * Help with WAI Site <../../../../sitehelp.html>
>     * Translations <../../../../wai-translations.html>
>     * About RSS <../../../../highlights/about-rss.html>
>     * Search </WAI/search.php>
> 
> *Editors Draft: 09 February 2010 *[changelog 
> <../../../changelogs/cl-training.html>] $Date: 2010/02/17 09:22:59 $ by 
> $Author: andrew $
> Status: This document is an in-progress Editor's Draft revision; /t//he 
> existing published version is at 
> <http://www.w3.org/WAI/training/Overview.html>./ Please send comments to 
> wai-eo-editors@w3.org <mailto:wai-eo-editors@w3.org> (a publicly 
> archived list).
> 
>     * Overview <Overview.html>
>     *
>       Topics
>     * Examples <scenarios.html>
>     * Tips <prep.html>
> 
> 
>   [Draft] Topics for Web Accessibility Presentations and Training
> 
> This page outlines some topics to speak about during a presentation, or 
> to use as a section of a training session. Some topics include draft 
> presentations that can be used directly, others are just frameworks to 
> build a presentation from. The topic overviews can also be used starting 
> points for developing training sessions as described on the training 
> examples <scenarios.html> page.
> 
> @@ explanation of topic sub-headings and structure
> 
> 
>     List of Topics
> 
> Select a link for more information about presenting that topic and 
> resources to draw from.
> 
>     * *Introducing Accessibility *
>          1. Introducing Web Accessibility <#t1>
>          2. How People with Disabilities Use the Web <#t2>
>          3. Components of Web Accessibility <#t9>
>          4. Promoting Web Accessibility <#t7>
>     * *Guidelines and Techniques *
>          5. Introducing WCAG 2.0 <#intro20>
>          6. Migrating to WCAG 2.0 <#migrate>
>          7. Designing Accessible Websites with WCAG 2 <#t4>
>          8. Browser Accessibility and UAAG <#t6a>
>          9. Authoring Tool Accessibility and ATAG <#t6b>
>         10. Accessible Rich Internet Applications <#aria>
>     * *Managing Accessibility*
>         11. Business Case for Web Accessibility <#t3>
>         12. Improving the Accessibility of Existing Websites <#improve>
>         13. Involving Users in Web Projects <#t10>
>         14. Web Accessibility and Older People <#older>
>         15. Accessibility and the Mobile Web <#mobile>
>         16. Web Accessibility Policy and Legislation <#policy>
>     * *Evaluating Accessibility*
>         17. Quick Check for Web Accessibility <#t5a>
>         18. Conformance Evaluation for Web Accessibility <#t5b>
> 
> 
>     1. Introducing Web Accessibility
> 
> *Goal:* To help people understand basic principles of web accessibility, 
> who is affected and why it is important.
> 
> *Audience:* Anyone with interest in the web or disability or related topics
> 
> 
>       Description
> 
> Introduction to the importance of the Web as an essential communication 
> tool and the fact that people with disabilities and older people should 
> have equal, barrier-free access.
> 
> 
>       What the audience will learn
> 
>     * Understand the meaning and importance of web accessibility for
>       people with disabilities and older people
>     * Appreciate the many ways that people's lives are affected by lack
>       of equal access to web based technologies
>     * Know about international efforts to ensure web accessibility
>     * How to get involved and where to get more information about web
>       accessibility
> 
> 
>       Notes for speaker
> 
> 
>         Key points
> 
>     * Access to the Web is an essential requirement for full
>       participation in the information society
>     * Web accessibility is a key aspect of providing equality of access
>       to the Web
>     * WAI guidelines provide an international standard for making the
>       Web accessible
> 
> 
>       Questions to engage the audience
> 
>     * Ask attendees what features of the built environment are provided
>       to accommodate people with disabilities. When they answer - ramps,
>       curbcuts, captions, automatic doors, elevators, etc - ask if
>       anyone uses those accommodations other than people with
>       disabilities. Discuss how accommodations for disability are useful
>       to all.
> 
> 
>         Optional demonstrations
> 
>     * Show some video of people with disabilities using the Web -
>       external page
>       <http://www.uiaccess.com/accessucd/resources_videos.html> or some
>       images of assistive technology users or a scenario from How People
>       with Disabilities use the Web
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/people-use-web.php>
>     * Show examples of good and poor web accessibility, and the effect
>       these have on access with assistive technologies (consider using
>       the Before and After Demonstration [Draft]
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/demos/bad/draft/2009/>)
> 
> 
>       Resources
> 
> 
>         Primary resources
> 
>     * Accessibility - W3C
>       <http://www.w3.org/standards/webdesign/accessibility> - introduces
>       the why, what and how of web accessibility
>     * Slides Why is web accessibility an issue
>       <http://www.w3.org/Talks/WAI-Intro/slide3-0.html> and Impact of
>       Web on people with disabilities
>       <http://www.w3.org/Talks/WAI-Intro/slide4-0.html> from * Overview
>       of WAI presentation* <http://www.w3.org/Talks/WAI-Intro/>
>     * Material from Use of the Web
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/presentations/ageing/waiage.html#webuse>
>       from *Web Accessibility for Older Users presentation*
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/presentations/ageing/>
>     * Introduction to Web Accessibility
>       <http://www.uiaccess.com/accessucd/resources_videos.html> - a
>       longer introduction to the what, why and how of web accessibility
>     * How People with Disabilities use the Web
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/people-use-web.php> - provides
>       examples of people with different disabilities using Web sites,
>       applications, browsers, and authoring tools
>     * Before and After Demonstration [Draft]
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/demos/bad/draft/2009/> - shows some typical
>       pages as inaccessible and accessible with minimal difference to
>       visual appearance
>     * Videos of People with Disabilities using ICT - external page
>       <http://www.uiaccess.com/accessucd/resources_videos.html> - some
>       demonstrations, some interviews (compiled by UIAccess)
> 
> 
>         Additional resources
> 
>     * Essential Components of Web Accessibility - Interdependencies
>       Between Components
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/components.php#depend> - shows how
>       Web accessibility depends on several components working together
>     * Inaccessibility of CAPTCHA
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/captcha.php> - examines potential
>       solutions to test that users are human, not software robots, in a
>       way that is accessible to people with disabilities
> 
> back to topics list <#toc>
> 
> 
>     2. How People with Disabilities Use the Web
> 
> 
>       Goal:
> 
> To provide an understanding of common barriers experienced by people 
> with disabilities and older users when accessing the Web.
> 
> 
>       Audience
> 
> Anyone with an interest in the web or disability or related topics
> 
> 
>       Description
> 
> Exploration of barriers faced by people with disabilities and older 
> people as they access the Web and an introduction to principles of 
> accessible design as a way to accommodate assistive technologies and 
> adaptive browsing strategies.
> 
> 
>       What the audience will learn
> 
>     * Understand that web accessibility has direct impact on the lives
>       of people with various disabilities and age-related impairments
>     * Learn about common barriers experienced by millions of Web users.
>     * Gain some familiarity with actual devices and adaptive strategies
>       used by people with disabilities and older users
>     * Appreciate the importance of the WAI guidelines in creating an
>       accessible web
>     * Know where to get more information
> 
> 
>       Notes for speaker
> 
> 
>         Key points
> 
>     * Many different types of disabilities and impairments have an
>       impact on web use
>     * Common types of accessibility barriers for web users with
>       disabilities and older web users
>     * People with disabilities and older users employ various assistive
>       technologies and adaptive strategies as they try to overcome barriers.
>     * Interplay of user agents with web content in delivering web
>       accessibility and role of WAI guidelines
> 
> 
>         Questions to engage the audience
> 
>     * Ask if they have ever used Velcro, and think about how it works.
>       Each side must do a job, one can't work without the other. Analogy
>       to assistive technology and accessible design.
> 
> 
>         Optional demonstrations
> 
>     * Demonstrate various assistive technologies and adaptive strategies.
>     * Illustrate web accessibility problems by browsing some popular
>       websites with only the keyboard or with the images and multimedia
>       turned off.
>     * Show video of people with disabilities using the Web.
>     * [@@ Activity: Participants use adaptive strategies such as
>       significant screen enlargement or keyboard-only navigation to
>       explore a number of websites, including their own, during or after
>       the session (move to examples?)]
> 
> 
>       Resources
> 
> 
>         Primary resources
> 
>     * Slide Web accessibility is a Cross-Disability Issue
>       <http://www.w3.org/Talks/WAI-Intro/slide6-0.html> from *Overview
>       of WAI presentation* <http://www.w3.org/Talks/WAI-Intro/>
>     * Material from Changing Abilities of Older People
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/presentations/ageing/waiage.html#abilities>
>       from *Web Accessibility for Older Users presentation*
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/presentations/ageing/>
>     * How People with Disabilities Use the Web
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/people-use-web.php>- provides
>       examples of people with different disabilities using Web sites,
>       applications, browsers, and authoring tools
>     * Better Web Browsing: Tips for Configuring Your Computer [Draft]
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/EO/Drafts/adaptive/strategies.html> -
>       references to resources to help people customize their web browser
>       and computer setup
>     * Essential Components of Web Accessibility - Interdependencies
>       Between Components
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/components.php#depend> - shows how
>       Web accessibility depends on several components working together
>       and the role of the WAI guidelines
>     * Videos of How People with Disabilities using ICT - external page
>       <http://www.uiaccess.com/accessucd/resources_videos.html> - some
>       demonstrations, some interviews (compiled by UIAccess)
> 
> back to topics list <#toc>
> 
> 
>     3. Components of Web Accessibility
> 
> 
>       Goal
> 
> To introduce the three sets of WAI guidelines that contribute to Web 
> accessibility.
> 
> 
>       Audience
> 
> Web developers and others with professional responsibility for creating 
> accessible online content and applications; accessibility advocates; ICT 
> departments
> 
> 
>       Description
> 
> Exploration of WAI Guidelines for user agents, for authoring tools and 
> for web content. Discussion of how they work together to substantially 
> improve Web accessibility.
> 
> 
>       What the audience will learn
> 
>     * Know that there are three related sets of WAI guidelines
>     * Understand the role of each guideline in creating and maintaining
>       an accessible Web
>     * Relate underlying technologies to accessibility (and appreciate
>       WAI-ARIA as an enabler)
>     * Understand how various guidelines and specifications interact to
>       deliver accessibility
> 
> 
>       Notes for speaker
> 
> 
>         Key points
> 
>     * Web accessiility depends on several components working together -
>       UUAG, ATAG, WCAG.
>     * Interaction of WAI guidelines in ensuring an accessible Web
>     * Role of underlying technologies (HTML, XML, CSS, SVG, SMIL, etc.)
> 
> 
>         Questions to engage the audience
> 
>     * Ask participants about which components and aspects they are
>       responsible for, or can influence, and discuss
> 
> 
>       Resources
> 
> 
>         Primary resources
> 
>     * *"Components of Web Accessibility" Presentation*
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/presentations/components/> - this
>       presentation can be used as the basis for this topic
>     * Essential Components of Web Accessibility
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/components.php> - shows how Web
>       accessibility depends on several components working together
>     * How People with Disabilities Use the Web
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/people-use-web.php> - provides
>       examples of people with different disabilities using Web sites,
>       applications, browsers, and authoring tools
>     * Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) Overview
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/wcag.php> - an overview of WCAG and
>       the related documentation
>     * Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG) Overview
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/atag.php> - an overview of ATAG and
>       the related documentation
>     * User Agent Accessibility Guidelines (UAAG) Overview
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/uaag.html> - an overview of UAAG and
>       the related documentation
> 
> 
>         Additional resources
> 
>     * Accessibility Features of HTML
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/References/HTML4-access>, Accessibility
>       Features of CSS <http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS-access>, Accessibility
>       Features of SMIL <http://www.w3.org/TR/SMIL-access/>,
>       Accessibility Features of SVG <http://www.w3.org/TR/SVG-access/>
>     * WAI-ARIA Overview <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/aria> - describes
>       the problems that WAI-ARIA addresses, and introduces the WAI-ARIA
>       suite of technical document
>     * Involving Users in Web Projects for Better, Easier Accessibility
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/users/involving> - a start to reaping the
>       benefits of involving people with disabilities and older people
>       with accessibility needs due to aging, throughout your projects
> 
> back to topics list <#toc>
> 
> 
>     4. Promoting Web Accessibility
> 
> 
>       Goal
> 
> To encourage web accessibility advocates and support their efforts to 
> promote inclusive design practices.
> 
> 
>       Audience
> 
> Accessibility advocates and all others wanting to encourage web 
> accessibility.
> 
> 
>       Description
> 
> Support for speakers who are promoting and furthering web accessibility 
> within groups of all sizes and in any situation, from formal talks to 
> personal conversations.
> 
> 
>       What the audience will learn
> 
>     * Understand that web accessibility is an ongoing challenge that
>       needs a high level of awareness
>     * Become familiar with the components (WCAG, ATAG and UAAG) that
>       make accessibility more easily achievable
>     * Understand that effective advocacy includes the need to be
>       flexible, to present information specific to each particular audience
>     * Identify opportunities to promote web accessibility.
>     * Learn how to participate in WAI and other W3C projects
> 
> 
>       Key points for speaker
> 
>     * Present various scenarios where discussion of web accessibility
>       can be appropriate and useful
>     * Encourage audience to think broadly about topics, beyond web sites
>       to policy, authoring tools and user agents.
>     * Introduce the WAI process and how audience members can get involved
>     * Provide clear instructions for finding and using support materials.
> 
> 
>       Demonstrations
> 
>     * Demonstrate use of WAI logos
> 
> 
>       Resources
> 
>     * Participating in WAI <http://www.w3.org/WAI/participation> -
>       describes the different participation opportunities in WAI
>     * WAI Working Groups and Interest Groups
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/groups.html> - listing of all he WAI
>       working groups and interest groups with links to their individual
>       pages
>     * Translating WAI Documents <http://www.w3.org/WAI/translation.html>
>       - pointer to translation policy; list of existing translations;
>       priority list of documents for translation
>     * Contacting Organizations about Inaccessible Websites
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/users/inaccessible.html> - steps and tips
>       to help report websites with accessibility problems
>     * Developing Organizational Policies on Web Accessibility
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/impl/pol.html> - addresses considerations
>       that can arise when developing organizational policies on Web
>       accessibility
>     * WCAG logos <http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG2-Conformance.html> & ATAG
>       logos <http://www.w3.org/WAI/ATAG10-Conformance.html> - how and
>       when to use the conformance logos
> 
> 
>         Additional resources
> 
>     * Why Standards Harmonization is Essential to Web Accessibility
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/Policy/harmon> - explains the key role that
>       harmonization of standards plays in increasing the accessibility
>       of the Web
>     * How WAI Develops Accessibility Guidelines through the W3C Process:
>       Milestones and Opportunities to Contribute
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/w3c-process.php> - introduces how WAI
>       works through a process designed to encourage community input and
>       consensus development
> 
> back to topics list <#toc>
> 
> 
>     5. Introducing WCAG 2.0
> 
> 
>       Goal
> 
> To provide basic familiarity with WCAG 2.0 and its benefits.
> 
> 
>       Audience
> 
> Anyone interested in providing equal access to the Web.
> 
> 
>       Description
> 
> Presentation of WCAG 2 and its benefits. Exploration of WCAG 2 
> principles, guidelines, success criteria, techniques and conformance 
> requirements along with the various supporting documents that help 
> developers and others understand and utilize the Guidelines.
> 
> 
>       What the audience will learn
> 
>     * Understand the four basic principles under which WCAG 2 is organized
>     * Relate the four organizing principles to the supporting
>       Guidelines, Success Criteria and associated techniques
>     * Understand the benefits of WCAG 2 in relation to
>       internationalization, interoperability, adaptability to emerging
>       technologies, etc
>     * Learn about tools and documents provided to support practical
>       implementation and testing
>     * Know how to locate support resources through the "How to Meet WCAG
>       2.0" gateway
> 
> 
>       Key points for speaker
> 
>     * The four principles of Web accessibility in WCAG 2.0
>     * The twelve WCAG 2.0 Guidelines (in brief)
>     * The structure of WCAG 2.0 success criteria and associated techniques.
>     * The benefits of WCAG 2.0
>     * The WCAG 2.0 documents
>     * Conforming to WCAG 2.0
> 
> 
>         Questions to engage audience
> 
>     * How many are using WCAG1? Other accessibility guidelines?
> 
> 
>       Demonstrations/Exercises/Activities
> 
>     * How to Meet WCAG 2.0 - A customizable quick reference to WCAG 2.0
>       requirements (success criteria) and techniques
> 
> 
>       Resources
> 
>     * Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) Overview
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/wcag.php> - an overview of WCAG and
>       the related documentation
>     * Understanding the Four Principles of Accessibility
>       <http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/intro.html#introduction-fourprincs-head>
>       (from understanding WCAG 2.0)
>     * The WCAG 2.0 Documents <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/wcag20> -
>       describes the different WCAG 2.0 technical documents, to help know
>       where to go for different types of information
>     * *Benefits of WCAG 2 presentation*
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/presentations/WCAG20_benefits/> - a
>       complete presentation to draw from
>     * Improving the Accessibility of Your Web Site
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/impl/improving.html> - approaches to make
>       the process of improving accessibility more efficient and effective
>     * How to Meet WCAG 2.0 Customizable Quick Reference
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/quickref/> - lists all of the WCAG
>       2.0 requirements and techniques to meet the requirements; also:
>           o Understanding WCAG 2.0 - A guide to understanding and
>             implementing Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0
>             <http://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/Overview.html>
>           o Techniques for WCAG 2.0 - Techniques and Failures for Web
>             Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0
>             <http://www.w3.org/TR/2008/NOTE-WCAG20-TECHS-20081211/Overview.html#contents>
>           o Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 (Technical
>             recommendation) <http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20/>
> 
> 
>         Additional resources
> 
>     * How WAI Develops Accessibility Guidelines through the W3C Process:
>       Milestones and Opportunities to Contribute
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/w3c-process.php> - introduces how WAI
>       works through a process designed to encourage community input and
>       consensus development
> 
> 
>         Handouts
> 
>     * WCAG 2 at a Glance
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/flyer/Overview.html#glance> - a paraphrased
>       summary of Web Content Accessibility Guidelines WCAG 2.0
> 
> back to topics list <#toc>
> 
> 
>     6. Migrating to WCAG 2
> 
> 
>       Goal
> 
> To help people understand the relative ease of migrating to WCAG 2.
> 
> 
>       Audience
> 
> Web developers; policy makers; accessibility advocates
> 
> 
>       Description
> 
> Support for those who have previously incorporated older accessibility 
> standards and are interested in WCAG 2. A guide to help prioritize, 
> analyze, and document technical and organizational requirements.
> 
> 
>       What the audience will learn
> 
>     * Understand that the basic goals of accessibility have not changed
>     * Learn to identify priority areas for revision based on impact and
>       effort
>     * Understand the need to analyze and relate those priorities to WCAG
>       2 Principles, Guidelines and Success Criteria
>     * Develop methods to document the process and update organizational
>       policies and supporting materials
>     * Know where to get more information, including WCAG 2 translations
> 
> 
>       Key points for speaker
> 
>     * Accessibility is fundamentally the same
>     * Impact and effort assessment to prioritize updates
>     * Determining conformance parameters, including technologies relied on
>     * Analysis of how the WCAG 2 technical requirements apply to your site
>     * Updating of organizational policies and technical documents
>     * Availability of WCAG 2 translations
> 
> 
>         Questions to engage audience
> 
>     * How many are using WCAG1? Other accessibility guidelines?
> 
> 
>       Resources
> 
>     * How to Update Your Web Site from WCAG 1.0 to WCAG 2.0
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/from10/websites.html> - detailed
>       guidance for designers, developers, and project managers
>     * How WCAG 2.0 Differs from WCAG 1.0
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/from10/diff.php> - describes the
>       differences in structure and the different support resources
>     * Comparison of WCAG 1.0 Checkpoints to WCAG 2.0
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/from10/comparison/> - lists the new
>       requirements in WCAG 2.0, and shows how each WCAG 1.0 checkpoint
>       relates to WCAG 2.0
>     * *Benefits of WCAG 2 presentation*
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/presentations/WCAG20_benefits/> - a
>       complete presentation to draw from
>     * Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) Overview
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/wcag.php> - an overview of WCAG and
>       the related documentation
>     * The WCAG 2.0 Documents <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/wcag20> -
>       describes the different WCAG 2.0 technical documents, to help know
>       where to go for different types of information
>     * WCAG 2.0 Translations <http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/translations>
>       - a list of complete and in-progress translations
> 
> 
>         Additional resources
> 
>     * Improving the Accessibility of Your Web Site
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/impl/improving.html> - approaches to make
>       the process of improving accessibility more efficient and effective
>     * Implementation Plan for Web Accessibility
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/impl/> - considerations for the planning
>       process for implementing web accessibility
> 
> 
>         Handouts
> 
>     * WCAG 2 at a Glance
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/flyer/Overview.html#glance> - a paraphrased
>       summary of Web Content Accessibility Guidelines WCAG 2.0
> 
> back to topics list <#toc>
> 
> 
>     7. Designing Accessible Websites (with WCAG 2)
> 
> 
>       Goal
> 
> Web authors learn how to create accessible web content and applications.
> 
> 
>       Audience
> 
> Web designers and developers
> 
> 
>       Description
> 
> Techniques for using WCAG 2 to develop websites that will be accessible 
> to people with disabilities and older people.
> NB. see also the Accessibility of Authoring Tools <#t6b> topic to 
> include aspects of user generated content.
> 
> 
>       What the audience will learn
> 
>     * Learn to use the How to Meet WCAG 2.0 Customizable Quick Reference
>       as a guide to find and implement proven accessible design techniques
>     * Understand the applicability of WCAG 2.0 Success Criteria to all
>       web technologies, including complex, dynamic, and media content
>     * Distinguish between the different categories of documented
>       techniques and their relationship to best practice
>     * Apply principles of accessibility using specific techniques that
>       are validated by means of success criteria
>     * Become familiar with navigating among the various resources
>     * Know where to get more information
> 
> 
>       Key points for speaker
> 
>     * WCAG 2.0 are technology neutral, general accessibility principles.
>     * Success Criteria for WCAG 2.0 apply to all web technologies
>     * Documented techniques for WCAG 2.0 fall into three categories -
>       failure, sufficient and advisory
>     * Advisory techniques value as best practice for specific groups
>       such as older people
>     * Use of How to Meet WCAG 2.0 Customizable Quick Reference for
>       finding documented techniques
>     * Detailed presentation of specific techniques
>     * Role of WAI-ARIA in ensuring accessibility of Ajax and related
>       DHTML technologies.
> 
> 
>         Questions to Engage Audience
> 
>     * Who is here? Developers? Designers? Project managers? Other?
>     * Currently using accessibility standards?
>     * How many avoid using AJAX for accessibility reasons? Heard of
>       WAI-ARIA? Using JS toolkits with accessibility built in?
> 
> 
>       Demonstrations/Exercises/Activities
> 
>     * The Before and After Demonstration pages showing some of the
>       improvements and techniques used
>     * The How to Meet WCAG 2.0 Customizable Quick Reference) to
>       demonstrate access to the WCAG 2.0 Techniques document and markup
>       examples
>     * A short captioned video (with transcript) to show how even a
>       multimedia example can be fully accessible
>     * Recoding some of the BAD 'before' pages to improve accessibility
> 
> 
>       Resources
> 
>     * Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) Overview
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/wcag.php> - an overview of WCAG and
>       the related documentation
>     * *Benefits of WCAG 2 presentation*
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/presentations/WCAG20_benefits/> - a
>       complete presentation to draw from
>     * The WCAG 2.0 Documents <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/wcag20> -
>       describes the different WCAG 2.0 technical documents, to help know
>       where to go for different types of information
>     * How to Meet WCAG 2.0 Customizable Quick Reference
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/quickref/> - lists all of the WCAG
>       2.0 requirements and techniques to meet the requirements; also
>       links to "Understanding" for descriptions, examples, and resources
>           o HTML techniques from How to Meet WCAG 2.0
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/quickref/>
>           o CCS techniques from How to Meet WCAG 2.0
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/quickref/>
>           o Scripting techniques from How to Meet WCAG 2.0
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/quickref/>
>           o SMIL techniques from How to Meet WCAG 2.0
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/quickref/>
>     * WCAG 2.0 Conformance
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/quickref/Overview.php?introopt=Y#conformance-reqs>
>       - lists the WCAG 2.0 conformance levels and requirements
>     * WAI-ARIA Overview <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/aria> - describes
>       the problems that WAI-ARIA addresses, and introduces the WAI-ARIA
>       suite of technical document
>     * Better Web Browsing: Tips for Configuring Your Computer [Draft]
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/EO/Drafts/adaptive/strategies.html> -
>       references to resources to help people customize their web browser
>       and computer setup
>     * @@ Accessible video sample (resource to be provided)
>     * @@ Techniques also exist for the accessibility of other web
>       technologies such as Flash, PDF, Silverlight, etc - these
>       techniques are documented on the vendor's site as well as by third
>       parties
> 
> 
>         Additional resources
> 
>     * Improving the Accessibility of Your Web Site
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/impl/improving.html> - approaches to make
>       the process of improving accessibility more efficient and effective
>     * Inaccessibility of CAPTCHA
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/captcha.php> - examines potential
>       solutions to test that users are human, not software robots, in a
>       way that is accessible to people with disabilities
>     * Accessibility Features of HTML
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/References/HTML4-access> - relates to HTML 4.0
>     * Accessibility Features of CSS <http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS-access> -
>       summarizes the features of the Cascading Style Sheets level 2
>       (CSS2) known to directly affect the accessibility of Web documents
>     * Accessibility Features of SMIL <http://www.w3.org/TR/SMIL-access/>
>       - summarizes the accessibility features of the Synchronized
>       Multimedia Language version 1.0 (SMIL 1.0),
>     * Accessibility Features of SVG <http://www.w3.org/TR/SVG-access/> -
>       describes the Scalable Vector Graphics 1.0 Specification (SVG 1.0)
>       features that support accessibility
>     * WAI-ARIA Authoring Practices 1.0
>       <http://www.w3.org/TR/wai-aria-practices/> - a guide to
>       understanding and implementing Accessible Rich Internet Applications
> 
> 
>         Handouts
> 
>     * Web Accessibility QuickTips - WCAG 2 at a Glance
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/glance/> - a paraphrased summary of
>       Web Content Accessibility Guidelines WCAG 2.0
>     * Including People with Disabilities in Design Studies
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/flyer/Overview.html#pwds>
> 
> back to topics list <#toc>
> 
> 
>     8. Browser Accessibility and UAAG
> 
> 
>       Goal
> 
> To help people understand the importance of user agents in enabling web 
> accessibility.
> 
> 
>       Audience
> 
> Web developers; ICT departments; accessibility advocates
> 
> 
>       Description
> 
> Exploration of the User Agent Accessibility Guidelines, the 
> interrelationship between content and browsers, and the adaptive 
> strategies that some people use with their browsers.
> 
> 
>       What the audience will learn
> 
>     * Understand UAAG as one of the key components to ensuring Web
>       accessibility
>     * Gain insight about how UAAG relates to other WAI guidelines [@@
>       and the current status of the Working Draft for UAAG 2.0]
>     * Learn about how browsers, media players, etc interface with
>       assistive technologies
>     * Learn about the adaptive strategies used by people with
>       disabilities in configuring user agents
> 
> 
>       Key points for speaker
> 
>     * The inter-relationship of the three WAI guidelines in achieving
>       accessibility
>     * General principles and specific checkpoints for accessibility of
>       browsers, multimedia players, and interface with assistive
>       technologies
>     * Adaptive strategies and assistive technologies people might adopt
>       for better web browsing
> 
> 
>         Questions to Engage Audience
> 
>     * Anyone aware of UUAG?
>     * Conditions that mimic disability? Adaptive strategies to share?
>     * What browser software and media players do people use?
>       Accessibility issues to share?
> 
> 
>       Exercises/Activities
> 
>     * In hands-on situations, have audience use adaptive strategies such
>       as significant screen enlargement or keyboard-only navigation to
>       explore a number of websites and multi-media sites. If not,
>       suggest they do so after the session
> 
> 
>       Resources
> 
>     * Essential Components of Web Accessibility
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/components.php> - shows how Web
>       accessibility depends on several components working together
>     * "Components of Web Accessibility" Presentation
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/presentations/components/> - presentation
>       that can be drawn on about different people and technology
>       components that have a role in providing Web accessibility
>     * User Agent Accessibility Guidelines (UAAG) Overview
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/uaag.html> - an overview of UAAG and
>       the related documentation
>     * Table of Checkpoints for User Agent Accessibility Guidelines 1.0
>       <http://www.w3.org/TR/UAAG/uaag10-chktable.html> - list may be
>       used to review a tool or set of tools for accessibility
>     * Better Web Browsing: Tips for Configuring Your Computer [Draft]
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/EO/Drafts/adaptive/strategies.html> -
>       references to resources to help people customize their web browser
>       and computer setup
> 
> 
>         Additional resources
> 
>     * User Agent Accessibility Guidelines 1.0
>       <http://www.w3.org/TR/UAAG10/> - specifies requirements that, if
>       satisfied by user agent developers, will lower barriers to
>       accessibility
>     * User Agent Accessibility Guidelines (UAAG) 2.0 [Draft]
>       <http://www.w3.org/TR/UAAG20/> - updated (draft) requirements
>       that, if satisfied by user agent developers, will lower barriers
>       to accessibility
>     * How WAI Develops Accessibility Guidelines through the W3C Process:
>       Milestones and Opportunities to Contribute
>       <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/w3c-process.php> - introduces how WAI
>       works through a process designed to encourage community input and
>       consensus development
> 
> back to topics list <#toc>
> 
> 
>     9. Authoring Tool Accessibility and ATAG
> 
> 
>       Goal
> 
> To help people understand the importance of authoring tools in achieving 
> web accessibility.
> 
> 
>       Audience
> 
> Web developers; web managers; procurement personnel
> 
> 
>       Description
> 
> Presentation of the Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines, the 
> interrelationship between content and accessible authoring tools, and 
> the ongoing merger of technologies.
> 
> 
>       What the audience will learn
> 
>     * Understand ATAG as one of the key components to ensuring Web
>       accessibility
>     * Gain insight about how ATAG relates to other WAI guidelines [@@
>       and the current status of the Working Draft for ATAG 2.0]
>     * Learn how to choose the most accessible options for in-house CMS
>       and other authoring tools
>     * Understand the concept of work-arounds for inaccessible tools
>     * Know where to get more information
> 
> 
>       Key points for speaker
> 
>     * The inter-relationship of the three WAI guidelines in achieving
>       accessibility
>     * The requirement for authoring tools to have an accessible
>       interface as well as to generate accessible web content
>     * The selection and use of in-house authoring tools or CMS's and
>       consideration of limitations or workarounds
>     * The design of accessible authoring tools, including Blogs and
>       other tools for user-generated-content, that support the
>       production of accessible content
> 
> 
>               Questions to Engage Audience
> 
>           o What CMS are people using, any accessibility issues to share?
>           o What blogging and social media tools are they using and any
>             accessibility issues?
>           o What barriers can they imagine are encountered by people
>             with various disabilities who try to blog and otherwise
>             participate in online exchanges?
> 
> 
>             Exercises/Activities
> 
>           o Have participants use adaptive strategies such as
>             significant screen enlargement or keyboard-only navigation
>             to publish some user generated content, during or after the
>             session
>           o Have participants check their authoring tool or CMS for
>             accessibility by users and accessibility of output after the
>             session
> 
> 
>             Resources
> 
>           o Essential Components of Web Accessibility
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/components.php> - shows how Web
>             accessibility depends on several components working together
>           o *"Components of Web Accessibility" Presentation*
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/presentations/components/> -
>             presentation that can be drawn on about different people and
>             technology components that have a role in providing Web
>             accessibility
>           o Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG) Overview
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/atag.php> - an overview of ATAG
>             and the related documentation
>           o Selecting and Using Authoring Tools for Web Accessibility
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/impl/software.html> - provides
>             information which may help find improved authoring tools
>             and/or work around the gaps in existing authoring tools
>           o Checklist of Checkpoints for Authoring Tool Accessibility
>             Guidelines 1.0
>             <http://www.w3.org/TR/ATAG/atag10-chktable.html> - lists of
>             all checkpoints from the Authoring Tool Accessibility
>             Guidelines 1.0
>           o Checklist for Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines 2.0
>             [Draft] <http://www.w3.org/TR/ATAG20/checklist.html> - lists
>             all of the guidelines and success criteria from ATAG 2.0
>           o Implementing ATAG 2.0 [Draft]
>             <http://www.w3.org/TR/IMPLEMENTING-ATAG20/> - a guide to
>             understanding and implementing Authoring Tool Accessibility
>             Guidelines 2.0
>           o Better Web Browsing: Tips for Configuring Your Computer
>             [Draft]
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/EO/Drafts/adaptive/strategies.html> -
>             references to resources to help people customize their web
>             browser and computer setup
> 
> 
>               Additional resources
> 
>           o How WAI Develops Accessibility Guidelines through the W3C
>             Process: Milestones and Opportunities to Contribute
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/w3c-process.php> - introduces
>             how WAI works through a process designed to encourage
>             community input and consensus development
> 
>       back to topics list <#toc>
> 
> 
>           10. Accessible Rich Internet Applications
> 
> 
>             Goal
> 
>       To provide an understanding of the requirements for accessible
>       rich internet applications.
> 
> 
>             Audience
> 
>       Web developers; @@ policy makers; @@ procurement personnel
> 
> 
>             Description
> 
>       Use of the WAI-ARIA resources to develop rich internet
>       applications that are accessible to people with disabilities.
> 
> 
>             What the audience will learn
> 
>           o Understand the various accessibility barriers of rich
>             internet applications
>           o Understand the relationship of WAI-ARIA to WCAG 2.0
>           o Learn about the technical solutions provided by WAI-ARIA
>           o Know where to get more information
> 
> 
>             Key points for speaker
> 
>           o Identify types of accessibility barriers in rich internet
>             applications
>           o Basic steps to make rich internet applications accessible
>           o WAI-ARIA features that make help make Ajax, DHTML, etc
>             accessible
>           o WAI-ARIA Roles, States, Properties, plus relationships and
>             live regions
> 
> 
>             Demonstrations/Exercises/Activities
> 
>           o Illustrate some WAI-ARIA uses like drag-and-drop, sliders,
>             navigation, etc
> 
> 
>             Resources
> 
>           o WAI-ARIA Overview <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/aria> -
>             describes the problems that WAI-ARIA addresses, and
>             introduces the WAI-ARIA suite of technical document
>           o WAI-ARIA FAQ <http://www.w3.org/WAI/aria/faq> - some
>             frequently asked questions (FAQ) about WAI-ARIA
>           o WAI-ARIA Primer <http://www.w3.org/TR/wai-aria-primer/> -
>             introduces developers to the accessibility problems that
>             WAI-ARIA is intended to solve, the fundamental concepts, and
>             the technical approach of WAI-ARIA
>           o WAI-ARIA Authoring Practices 1.0
>             <http://www.w3.org/TR/wai-aria-practices/> - a guide to
>             understanding and implementing Accessible Rich Internet
>             Applications
>           o WAI-ARIA techniques from How to Meet WCAG 2.0
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/quickref/Overview.php>
> 
> 
>               Additional resources
> 
>           o Scripting techniques from How to Meet WCAG 2.0
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/quickref/Overview.php>
>           o How WAI Develops Accessibility Guidelines through the W3C
>             Process: Milestones and Opportunities to Contribute
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/w3c-process.php> - introduces
>             how WAI works through a process designed to encourage
>             community input and consensus development
> 
>       back to topics list <#toc>
> 
> 
>           11. Business Case for Web Accessibility
> 
> 
>             Goal
> 
>       To provide an appreciation of the business case for web accessibility.
> 
> 
>             Audience
> 
>       Web accessibility advocates, web site managers and other
>       management staff who need data to inform decisions about the
>       return on web accessibility investment
> 
> 
>             Description
> 
>       Exploration of social, technical, financial and legal factors that
>       influence an organization's policy decisions about web accessibility.
> 
> 
>             What the audience will learn
> 
>           o Learn about the changing demographics of web users as the
>             world population ages
>           o Relate web accessibility to improved cross-device browsing
>             including television, mobile, etc
>           o Survey social factors, procurement practices and government
>             policies relevant to accessibility and business
>           o Understand the legal landscape and liabilities associated
>             with web accessibility
>           o Learn from case studies and successful corporate
>             accessibility policies and practices
>           o Know where to get more information
> 
> 
>             Key points for speaker
> 
>           o Disability statistics relevant to use of the Web, including
>             population ageing
>           o Carry-over benefits of accessibility for other Web users
>           o Mainstreaming of accessibility with device independence -
>             car, television, games consoles, mobile-phone, etc with
>             speech output, touch screen, motion sensors, etc
>           o Social, technical, financial and legal factors in developing
>             a business case as relevant to the audience's context
>           o Government, industry, or other policies that are relevant to
>             the audience's context
>           o Case studies of accessibility improvements
>           o Features of an organization's policy for web accessibility
> 
> 
>               Questions to engage audience
> 
>           o Parents, grandparents spending money on the web? Barriers
>             encountered?
>           o Anyone want to share barriers encountered in mobile browsing?
>           o How many work for company with an accessibility policy in place?
> 
> 
>             Demonstrations
> 
>           o Web access via a mobile phone or hand-held device to
>             popular/relevant websites (or use a mobile browser emulation)
> 
> 
>             Resources
> 
>           o Developing a Web Accessibility Business Case for Your
>             Organization <http://www.w3.org/WAI/bcase/Overview.html> - a
>             suite of five web pages covering the social, technical,
>             financial, and legal and policy factors in the business case
>             for Web accessibility
>           o Online slide Web accessibility is a marketplace issue
>             <http://www.w3.org/Talks/WAI-Intro/slide7-0.html> from
>             *Overview of WAI presentation*
>             <http://www.w3.org/Talks/WAI-Intro/>
>           o Material from Changing demographics
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/presentations/ageing/waiage.html#demog>
>             and Changing abilities
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/presentations/ageing/waiage.html#abilities>
>             from *Web Accessibility for Older Users presentation
>             [Draft]* <http://www.w3.org/WAI/presentations/ageing/>
>           o @@ Also see your national statistics agency (and possibly
>             some national disability organizations)
>           o Online slide accessibility contributes to universal design
>             <http://www.w3.org/Talks/WAI-Intro/slide8-0.html> from
>             Overview of WAI <http://www.w3.org/Talks/WAI-Intro/>
>           o Web Content Accessibility and Mobile Web: Making a Web Site
>             Accessible Both for People with Disabilities and for Mobile
>             Devices <http://www.w3.org/WAI/mobile/> - introduces the
>             similarities along with benefits of addressing both areas
>           o Case Studies of Accessibility Improvements
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/bcase/resources.html#cases> from
>             Resources for Developing a Web Accessibility Business Case
>             for Your Organization
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/bcase/resources.html>
>           o Policies Relating to Web Accessibility
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/Policy/> - links to laws and policies
>             regarding Web accessibility around the world (not definitive)
>           o Developing Organizational Policies on Web Accessibility
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/impl/pol.html> - addresses
>             considerations that can arise when developing organizational
>             policies on Web accessibility
> 
>       back to topics list <#toc>
> 
> 
>           12. Improving the Accessibility of Existing Websites
> 
> 
>             Goal
> 
>       To support organizations that are taking the initial steps towards
>       implementing web accessibility.
> 
> 
>             Audience
> 
>       Web developers; website owners; decision makers in corporate,
>       government and educational institutions
> 
> 
>             Description
> 
>       Start the process of embracing web accessibility by improving
>       existing websites. Once accessibility is achieved, learn to
>       maintain it over time.
> 
> 
>             What the audience will learn
> 
>           o What is web accessibility?
>           o What standards to use. Is formal policy needed?
>           o How to identify existing accessibility barriers
>           o How to prioritize repair process and schedule
>           o How to maintain accessibility over time
> 
> 
>             Key points for speaker
> 
>           o Identifying scope and nature of accessibility problems
>           o Creating an implementation plan to optimize accessibility
>             improvements
>           o Prioritizing 'low-hanging-fruit' for immediate accessibility
>             fixes
>           o Planning for ongoing accessibility and creating an
>             accessibility policy and monitoring process
> 
> 
>             Demonstrations/Exercises/Activities
> 
>           o Quick techniques for preliminary web accessibility review
> 
> 
>             Resources
> 
>           o Improving the Accessibility of Your Web Site
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/impl/improving.html> - approaches to
>             make the process of improving accessibility more efficient
>             and effective
>           o Preliminary Review of Web Sites for Accessibility
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/eval/preliminary.html> - describes a
>             method to quickly identify some accessibility problems on a
>             website
>           o Conformance Evaluation of Web Sites for Accessibility
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/eval/conformance.html> - describes a
>             conformance evaluation method that combines automatic,
>             semi-automatic, and manual testing
>           o Implementation Plan for Web Accessibility
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/impl/> - considerations for the
>             planning process for implementing web accessibility
> 
> 
>               Additional resources
> 
>           o Developing a Web Accessibility Business Case for Your
>             Organization <http://www.w3.org/WAI/bcase/Overview.html> - a
>             suite of five web pages covering the social, technical,
>             financial, and legal and policy factors in the business case
>             for Web accessibility
>           o Involving Users in Web Projects for Better, Easier
>             Accessibility <http://www.w3.org/WAI/users/involving> - a
>             start to reaping the benefits of involving people with
>             disabilities and older people with accessibility needs due
>             to aging, throughout your projects
> 
>       back to topics list <#toc>
> 
> 
>           13. Involving Users in Web Projects
> 
> 
>             Goal
> 
>       To encourage all web projects to involve users from the start.
> 
> 
>             Audience
> 
>       Project Managers; development teams; QA and usability departments
> 
> 
>             Description
> 
>       How and why to involve people with disabilities and older users
>       from the beginning of a web development project. Demonstration of
>       how users can identify usability issues that are not always
>       discovered by conformance evaluation alone.
> 
> 
>             What the audience will learn
> 
>           o Understand benefits of involving users with disabilities and
>             older users in development and evaluation of web sites
>           o Gain skills in how to engage such users
>           o Understand the complementary nature of conformance to
>             guidelines and user experience reporting
>           o Know where to get more information
> 
> 
>             Key points for speaker
> 
>           o The importance and benefits of involving users in all
>             aspects of web projects
>           o How and when to involve users throughout a project
>           o The benefits of involving users in web accessibility evaluation
>           o How to combine testing with users with formal conformance
>             evaluation methods
>           o Care required when drawing conclusions
> 
> 
>             Demonstrations/Exercises/Activities
> 
>           o Ask participants to share experiences of involving users in
>             their projects
>           o Ask participants to identify opportunities to involve users
>             in their own project and discuss
> 
> 
>             Resources
> 
>           o Involving Users in Web Projects for Better, Easier
>             Accessibility <http://www.w3.org/WAI/users/involving> - a
>             start to reaping the benefits of involving people with
>             disabilities and older people with accessibility needs due
>             to aging, throughout your projects
>           o Involving Users in Evaluating Web Accessibility
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/eval/users.html> - describes the
>             benefits from evaluating with real people and identifying
>             usability issues that are not discovered by conformance
>             evaluation alone
>           o How People with Disabilities Use the Web
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/people-use-web.php>- provides
>             examples of people with different disabilities using Web
>             sites, applications, browsers, and authoring tools
> 
> 
>               Handouts
> 
>           o Including People with Disabilities in Design Studies
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/flyer/Overview.html#pwds>
> 
>       back to topics list <#toc>
> 
> 
>           14. Web Accessibility and Older Users
> 
> 
>             Goal
> 
>       To help people understand the importance of web accessibility for
>       older people.
> 
> 
>             Audience
> 
>       Web developers; procurement personnel; accessibility advocates
> 
> 
>             Description
> 
>       Explore the importance of the adoption of WAI guidelines to meet
>       the needs of older users as global demographics change with the
>       aging of the world's population.
> 
> 
>             What the audience will learn
> 
>           o Understand that the world population is aging and that
>             increasing numbers of older users are online
>           o Relate the age related impairments of older people to the
>             need for web accessibility
>           o Understand the value of conforming to WAI Guidelines to meet
>             the needs of older users
>           o Learn about the WAI-AGE project and how to become involved
>           o Know where to get more information
> 
> 
>             Key points for speaker
> 
>           o Demographic forecasts show a rapidly increasing older
>             population in most countries
>           o Older people are online taking advantage of unprecedented
>             opportunities, but facing barriers
>           o Web accessibility needs of older people are similar to the
>             needs of people with disabilities as aging is often
>             accompanied by changing abilities.
>           o Importance of all WAI Guidelines and standards harmonization
>             in a converging web world
>           o WAI-AGE project deliverables for industry and users
>           o Opportunities to become involved with WAI's work on ageing
> 
> 
>             Demonstrations/Exercises/Activities
> 
>           o Show some video with older people using the Web - external
>             page <http://www.uiaccess.com/accessucd/resources_videos.html>
> 
> 
>             Resources
> 
>           o *Web Accessibility for Older Users presentation*
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/presentations/ageing/> - this
>             presentation can be used as the basis for a presentation on
>             this topic
>           o Overview of "Web Accessibility for Older Users: A Literature
>             Review" <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/wai-age-literature.php>
>             - the Literature Review is to inform education and outreach
>             to better promote accessibility solutions for older Web users
>           o WAI-AGE Project page
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/WAI-AGE/Overview.html> - includes
>             information about the activities of the WAI-AGE project
>           o WAI-AGE Project Deliverables page
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/WAI-AGE/deliverables.html> - contains
>             an overview of the education and outreach material to be
>             updated or developed within the WAI-AGE Project
>           o Videos of People with Disabilities using ICT - external page
>             <http://www.uiaccess.com/accessucd/resources_videos.html> -
>             some demonstrations, some interviews (compiled by UIAccess)
> 
> 
>               Additional resources
> 
>           o Developing a Web Accessibility Business Case for Your
>             Organization <http://www.w3.org/WAI/bcase/Overview.html> - a
>             suite of five web pages covering the social, technical,
>             financial, and legal and policy factors in the business case
>             for Web accessibility
>           o Why Standards Harmonization is Essential to Web
>             Accessibility <http://www.w3.org/WAI/Policy/harmon> -
>             explains the key role that harmonization of standards plays
>             in increasing the accessibility of the Web
> 
>       back to topics list <#toc>
> 
> 
>           15. Accessibility and the Mobile Web
> 
> 
>             Goal
> 
>       To provide an understanding of the overlapping issues between web
>       accessibility and mobile web use.
> 
> 
>             Audience
> 
>       Web developers; procurement personnel; web policy makers
> 
> 
>             Description
> 
>       Encourage concurrent development of websites for both
>       accessibility and mobile use through understanding of common
>       barriers faced by both groups of users; the overlapping solutions
>       available to developers; and the ease of meeting the needs of both
>       groups simultaneously.
> 
>           o Understand the similarities in the experience of web users
>             with disabilities and users of mobile devices
>           o Understand the differences between those user groups
>           o Learn to meet the overlapping requirements during development
>           o If one set of requirements has been met, learn to
>             incorporate the other
> 
> 
>             Key points for speaker
> 
>           o Experiences shared by people with disabilities and mobile
>             web users - Perceivable; Operable; Understandable; Robust
>           o Similarity and overlap of solutions for web accessibility
>             and mobile web
>           o Differences of approach between WCAG and Mobile Web Best
>             Practices (MWBP)
>           o Ease of meeting the requirements of both audiences
>                 + Incorporating mobile web best practices if you are
>                   already accessible
>                 + Incorporating accessibility if you are already mobile
>                   friendly
>                 + Meeting the needs of both during development
> 
> 
>             Demonstrations/Exercises/Activities
> 
>           o Demonstrate relevant websites on a mobile device or using a
>             mobile browser emulator
>           o Demonstrate overlapping accessibility issues such as
>             keyboard access, tunnel vision (via emulation), screen
>             magnifier, linearization via removal of style sheets,
>             scripting not supported
> 
> 
>             Resources
> 
>           o Web Content Accessibility and Mobile Web: Making a Web Site
>             Accessible Both for People with Disabilities and for Mobile
>             Devices <http://www.w3.org/WAI/mobile/> - introduces the
>             similarities along with benefits of addressing both areas
>           o Shared Web Experiences: Barriers Common to Mobile Device
>             Users and People with Disabilities
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/mobile/experiences> - provides
>             examples of barriers that people with disabilities and
>             people using mobile devices experience when interacting with
>             Web content
>           o Relationship between Mobile Web Best Practices (MWBP) and
>             Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG)
>             <http://www.w3.org/TR/mwbp-wcag/> - technical report
>             describing the similarities and differences between the
>             requirements in WCAG and MWBP
>           o  From MWBP to WCAG 2.0
>             <http://www.w3.org/TR/mwbp-wcag/mwbp-wcag20.html> (and From
>             MWBP to WCAG 1.0)
>             <http://www.w3.org/TR/mwbp-wcag/mwbp-wcag10.html> -
>             describes what also needs to be done to meet WCAG for those
>             familiar with MWBP
>           o  From WCAG 2.0 to MWBP
>             <http://www.w3.org/TR/mwbp-wcag/wcag20-mwbp.html> (and From
>             WCAG 1.0 to MWBP
>             <http://www.w3.org/TR/mwbp-wcag/wcag10-mwbp.html>) -
>             describes what also needs to be done to meet MWBP for those
>             familiar with WCAG
> 
> 
>               Additional resources
> 
>           o Mobile Web Best Practices 1.0
>             <http://www.w3.org/TR/mobile-bp/> - technical report
>             specifying Best Practices for delivering web content to
>             mobile devices
>           o Developing a Web Accessibility Business Case for Your
>             Organization <http://www.w3.org/WAI/bcase/Overview.html> - a
>             suite of five web pages covering the social, technical,
>             financial, and legal and policy factors in the business case
>             for Web accessibility
>           o How People with Disabilities Use the Web
>             <http://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/people-use-web.php>- provides
>             examples of people with different disabilities using Web
>             sites, applications, browsers, and authoring tools
> 
>       back to topics list <#toc>
> 
> 
>           16. Web Accessibility Policy and Legislation
> 
> 
>             Goal
> 
>       To provide an appreciation of local web accessibility policy and
>       legislation, the need for international harmonization, and the
>       essential elements of an organizational policy.
> 
> 
>             Audience
> 
>       Web policy makers; procurement personnel; accessibility advocates
> 
> 
>             Description
> 
>       Examine global policy and legal requirements that companies and
>       organizations face as they meet local nondiscrimination and web
>       accessibility laws. Explore the movement for international
>       standards harmonization and learn to develop and implement
>       organizational accessibility policy.
> 
> 
>             What the audience will learn
> 
>           o Learn about web accessibility policy specific to local audience
>           o Understand the need for and the benefits of international
>             policy and standards harmonization
>           o Learn the essential elements that an agency, business or
>             organization needs in order to develop successful web
>             accessibility policy
>           o Know where to get more information
> 
> 
>             Key points for speaker
> 
>           o Legal and policy factors apply differently to specific
>             organizations and situations
>           o Many countries are ratifying the UN Convention on the Rights
>             of Persons with Disabilities
>           o Determination of legal and policy factors applying to a
>             specific organization
>           o Why standards harmonization is important for web accessibility
>           o Developing a web accessibility policy for an organization
> 
> 
>             Demonstrations/Exercises/Activities
> 
>                   Have audience work in small groups with policy
>                   development worksheet including stakeholders, external
>                   drivers, standards, and any other factors that will
>                   contribute to poicy development. 
> 
> 
>                   Resources
> 
>                 + Legal and Policy Factors in Developing a Web
>                   Accessibility Business Case for Your Organization
>                   <http://www.w3.org/WAI/bcase/pol.html> - provides
>                   guidance on addressing legal and policy factors in a
>                   business case for Web accessibility
>                 + UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with
>                   Disabilities
>                   <http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?navid=12&pid=150>
>                   - ratified by many countries and specifically includes
>                   accessibility of the Internet and other information
>                   and communications technology (ICT)
>                 + International Policies Relating to Web Accessibility
>                   <http://www.w3.org/WAI/Policy/> - links to laws and
>                   policies regarding Web accessibility around the world
>                   (not definitive)
>                 + Why Standards Harmonization is Essential to Web
>                   Accessibility <http://www.w3.org/WAI/Policy/harmon> -
>                   explains the key role that harmonization of standards
>                   plays in increasing the accessibility of the Web
>                 + Developing Organizational Policies on Web
>                   Accessibility <http://www.w3.org/WAI/impl/pol.html> -
>                   addresses considerations that can arise when
>                   developing organizational policies on Web accessibility
> 
> 
>                     Additional resources
> 
>                 + Benefits of WCAG 2 presentation
>                   <http://www.w3.org/WAI/presentations/WCAG20_benefits/>
> 
>             back to topics list <#toc>
> 
> 
>                 17. Quick Check for Web Accessibility
> 
> 
>                   Goal
> 
>             To introduce the concept of a quick website accessibility
>             check, including benefits, techniques and limitations.
> 
> 
>                   Audience
> 
>             Web developers; website managers; project managers;
>             procurement personnel; accessibility advocates
> 
> 
>                   Description
> 
>             Explore the difference between a quick preliminary website
>             accessibility check and a more thorough conformance
>             evaluation review. Easy evaluation techniques provide
>             participants with the ability to perform quick reviews and
>             present the results.
> 
> 
>                   What the audience will learn
> 
>                 + Learn what is meant by a quick website accessibility check
>                 + Understand basic techniques for performing a quick review
>                 + Learn the difference between a quick check and a full
>                   conformance review
>                 + Know where to get more information
> 
> 
>                   Key points for speaker
> 
>                 + Limitations of a quick web accessibility check
>                 + Selecting representative pages to check
>                 + Quick checks to make with a regular browser
>                 + Checking web pages using specialized browsers
>                 + Use of automated web accessibility evaluation tools
>                   (noting that while many tools are still oriented
>                   towards WCAG 1.0 evaluation they can still give a
>                   useful overview)
>                 + Summarizing the results of the quick check
> 
>             A longer presentation might also cover:
> 
>                 + Difference between an initial evaluation and a
>                   conformance evaluation
>                 + Role of users in web accessibility evaluation
>                 + Combined expertise required for full evaluation
> 
> 
>                   Demonstrations/Exercises/Activities
> 
>                 + "Before and After Demonstration" site for illustrating
>                   browser-based evaluation techniques and automated tools
>                 + Quick evaluation of participants' own sites and
>                   summary of results
> 
> 
>                   Resources
> 
>                 + Preliminary Review of Web Sites for Accessibility
>                   <http://www.w3.org/WAI/eval/preliminary.html> -
>                   describes a method to quickly identify some
>                   accessibility problems on a website
>                 + Selecting Web Accessibility Evaluation Tools
>                   <http://www.w3.org/WAI/eval/selectingtools.html> -
>                   highlights different features of evaluation tools
>                   which can assist during evaluation reviews
>                 + Web Accessibility Evaluation Tools
>                   <http://www.w3.org/WAI/ER/tools/Overview.html> -
>                   filterable list of Web accessibility evaluation tools
>                 + Involving Users in Evaluating Web Accessibility
>                   <http://www.w3.org/WAI/eval/users.html> - describes
>                   the benefits from evaluating with real people and
>                   identifying usability issues that are not discovered
>                   by conformance evaluation alone
>                 + Using Combined Expertise to Evaluate Web Accessibility
>                   <http://www.w3.org/WAI/eval/reviewteams.html> -
>                   describes the diverse kinds of expertise and
>                   perspectives required to evaluate the accessibility of
>                   web content
>                 + Before and After Demonstration [Draft]
>                   <http://www.w3.org/WAI/demos/bad/draft/2009/> - shows
>                   some typical pages as inaccessible and accessible with
>                   minimal difference to visual appearance
> 
> 
>                     Additional resources
> 
>                 + Better Web Browsing: Tips for Configuring Your
>                   Computer [Draft]
>                   <http://www.w3.org/WAI/EO/Drafts/adaptive/strategies.html>
>                   - references to resources to help people customize
>                   their web browser and computer setup
>                 + Conformance Evaluation of Web Sites for Accessibility
>                   <http://www.w3.org/WAI/eval/conformance.html> -
>                   describes a conformance evaluation method that
>                   combines automatic, semi-automatic, and manual testing
>                 + Evaluation Approaches for Specific Contexts
>                   <http://www.w3.org/WAI/eval/considerations.html> -
>                   describes considerations for evaluation of large and
>                   complex websites
>                 + Involving Users in Web Projects for Better, Easier
>                   Accessibility <http://www.w3.org/WAI/users/involving>
>                   - a start to reaping the benefits of involving people
>                   with disabilities and older people with accessibility
>                   needs due to aging, throughout your projects
> 
>             back to topics list <#toc>
> 
> 
>                 18. Conformance Evaluation for Web Accessibility
> 
> 
>                   Goal
> 
>             To help people understand how to undertake a conformance
>             review for website accessibility.
> 
> 
>                   Audience
> 
>             Web developers; accessibility experts
> 
> 
>                   Description
> 
>             Tools and techniques to perform a more detailed, thorough
>             website accessibility conformance evaluation review,
>             including the role of user testing.
> 
> 
>                   What the audience will learn
> 
>                 + Understand the concept of a conformance evaluation for
>                   websites and how it differs from a quick review
>                 + Be able to define scope, conformance level and sample size
>                 + Learn about validators and automated tools and be able
>                   to choose among them
>                 + Be able to report findings in a comprehensive and
>                   understandable way
>                 + Understand when and how to involve users in evaluation
>                   process
>                 + Know when and where to get more help and more information
> 
> 
>                   Key points for speaker
> 
>                 + Difference between an initial evaluation and a
>                   conformance evaluation
>                 + Determining the scope of the evaluation and desired
>                   conformance level
>                 + Selecting a representative page sample to evaluate,
>                   including consideration for dynamic sites and other
>                   contexts
>                 + Considerations in selecting and using appropriate
>                   evaluation tools, including validators and automated tools
>                 + Role of specialist help that may be appropriate
>                 + Steps in performing manual evaluation of
>                   representative page
>                       # Understanding some of the tools available to
>                         assist manual evaluation
>                 + Summarizing and reporting the evaluation findings
>                 + Benefits of involving users for a comprehensive evaluation
> 
> 
>                   Demonstrations/Exercises/Activities
> 
>                 + "Before and After Demonstration" site to illustrate
>                   evaluation techniques and tools
>                 + Try several different evaluation tools on same set of
>                   websites
>                 + Evaluate some relevant pages, recommend improvements,
>                   and discuss
> 
> 
>                   Resources
> 
>                 + Conformance Evaluation of Web Sites for Accessibility
>                   <http://www.w3.org/WAI/eval/conformance.html> -
>                   describes a conformance evaluation method that
>                   combines automatic, semi-automatic, and manual testing
>                 + Evaluation Approaches for Specific Contexts
>                   <http://www.w3.org/WAI/eval/considerations.html> -
>                   describes considerations for evaluation of large and
>                   complex websites
>                 + Selecting Web Accessibility Evaluation Tools
>                   <http://www.w3.org/WAI/eval/selectingtools.html> -
>                   highlights different features of evaluation tools
>                   which can assist during evaluation reviews
>                 + Web Accessibility Evaluation Tools
>                   <http://www.w3.org/WAI/ER/tools/Overview.html> -
>                   filterable list of Web accessibility evaluation tools
>                 + @@ Checklist of Checkpoints for Web Content
>                   Accessibility Guidelines 1.0
>                   <http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG10/full-checklist.html>
>                 + How to Meet WCAG 2.0 Customizable Quick Reference
>                   <http://www.w3.org/WAI/WCAG20/quickref/> - lists all
>                   of the WCAG 2.0 requirements and techniques to meet
>                   the requirements
>                 + Template for Accessibility Evaluation Reports
>                   <http://www.w3.org/WAI/eval/template.html> (refers to
>                   WCAG 1.0, but applicable to WCAG 2.0)
>                   See also the Before and After Demonstration Reports
>                   [Draft]
>                   <http://www.w3.org/WAI/demos/bad/draft/2009/report/before/home.php>
>                 + Involving Users in Evaluating Web Accessibility
>                   <http://www.w3.org/WAI/eval/users.html> - describes
>                   the benefits from evaluating with real people and
>                   identifying usability issues that are not discovered
>                   by conformance evaluation alone
>                 + Involving Users in Web Projects for Better, Easier
>                   Accessibility <http://www.w3.org/WAI/users/involving>
>                   - a start to reaping the benefits of involving people
>                   with disabilities and older people with accessibility
>                   needs due to aging, throughout your projects
>                 + Before and After Demonstration [Draft]
>                   <http://www.w3.org/WAI/demos/bad/draft/2009/> - shows
>                   some typical pages as inaccessible and accessible with
>                   minimal difference to visual appearance
> 
> 
>                     Additional resources
> 
>                 + Involving Users in Web Projects for Better, Easier
>                   Accessibility <http://www.w3.org/WAI/users/involving>
>                   - a start to reaping the benefits of involving people
>                   with disabilities and older people with accessibility
>                   needs due to aging, throughout your projects
>                 + Preliminary Review of Web Sites for Accessibility
>                   <http://www.w3.org/WAI/eval/preliminary.html> -
>                   describes a method to quickly identify some
>                   accessibility problems on a website
>                 + Using Combined Expertise to Evaluate Web Accessibility
>                   <http://www.w3.org/WAI/eval/reviewteams.html> -
>                   describes the diverse kinds of expertise and
>                   perspectives required to evaluate the accessibility of
>                   web content
> 
> 
>                     Handouts
> 
>                 + Including People with Disabilities in Design Studies
>                   <http://www.w3.org/WAI/flyer/Overview.html#pwds>
> 
>             back to topics list <#toc>
> 
> 
>                 Topic Outline Structure
> 
> 
>                   Goal
> 
>             @@
> 
> 
>                   Audience
> 
>             @@
> 
> 
>                   Description
> 
>             @@
> 
> 
>                   What the audience will learn
> 
>                 + @@
> 
> 
>                   Notes for speaker
> 
>                 + @@
> 
> 
>                     Key points
> 
>                 + @@
> 
> 
>                     Optional demonstrations
> 
>                 + @@
> 
> 
>                     Questions to engage the audience
> 
>                 + @@
> 
> 
>                     Handouts
> 
>                 + @@
> 
> 
>                   Resources
> 
> 
>                     Primary resources
> 
>                 + @@
> 
> 
>                     Additional resources
> 
>                 + @@
> 
>             back to topics list <#toc>
> 
>             [*Previous Page* - Overview (Draft) <Overview.html> | Topics
>             List <#toc> | *Next Page* - Examples (Draft) <scenarios.html>]
> 
> 
>     Document Information
> 
> *Version**: Draft in progress, February 2010* [changelog 
> <../../../changelogs/cl-responding.html>]
> Editor: Andrew Arch <http://www.w3.org/People/Andrew/>; Previous editor: 
> Judy Brewer <http://www.w3.org/People/Brewer/>. Contributors: Sharron 
> Rush. Developed with participants of the WAI-AGE Task Force 
> <http://www.w3.org/WAI/EO/2008/wai-age-tf.html> and Education and 
> Outreach Working Group <http://www.w3.org/WAI/EO/>. Developed as part of 
> the WAI-AGE Project <http://www.w3.org/WAI/WAI-AGE/>* (IST 035015*) 
> funded by the *European Commission under the 6th Framework*.
> 
> [Contacting WAI </WAI/contacts>] Feedback welcome to 
> wai-eo-editors@w3.org <mailto:wai-eo-editors@w3.org> (a publicly 
> archived list).
> 
> Copyright </Consortium/Legal/ipr-notice#Copyright> (c) 1994-2010 W3C 
> </>^(R) (MIT <http://www.csail.mit.edu/>, ERCIM <http://www.ercim.eu/>, 
> Keio <http://www.keio.ac.jp/>), All Rights Reserved.
> Creative Commons License 
> <http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/> This work is 
> published and licensed under a Creative Commons 
> Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License 
> <http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/>. For commercial use, 
> please contact wai@w3.org <mailto:wai@w3.org> and Judy Brewer 
> <http://www.w3.org/People/Brewer/>.
> 
Received on Thursday, 25 February 2010 17:09:30 UTC

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