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RE: Links and target frames

From: Judy Gregg <judy@accessibilityexperts.ca>
Date: Mon, 19 Nov 2012 11:44:53 -0500
To: "'Jonathan Avila'" <jon.avila@ssbbartgroup.com>, "'Harry Loots'" <harry.loots@ieee.org>
Cc: "'WAI Group'" <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Message-ID: <!&!AAAAAAAAAAAYAAAAAAAAABYEk0HLJ1tOge4e0j3UT0HCgAAAEAAAAOqmUdCZ8oVLmQEd9yAbZFMBAAAAAA==@accessibilityexperts.ca>
Hi Jonathan,

 

Thank you for your response, I appreciate it. Thank you Harry and David as
well.

This makes sense to what the user was saying when they indicated that the
back button does not always work for them. Which would lead us to think that
they were using the keystroke instead of the menu bar of their browser.

Thank you again.

 

Judy

 

From: Jonathan Avila [mailto:jon.avila@ssbbartgroup.com] 
Sent: November-19-12 11:29 AM
To: Harry Loots; judy@accessibilityexperts.ca
Cc: WAI Group
Subject: RE: Links and target frames

 

Judy, in my experience the "screen tip" field for links in Word is not
announced by screen readers in Word and is translated to the title attribute
in HTML.  Title attributes for links are often not announced automatically
be screen reader users and are usually not keyboard accessible in web
browsers.

 

Opening the Word document in a separate window would likely be better as it
would be easier to get back to the prior web page.  The user however can get
back to the web page even when a Word document appears - the issue is not
with the "back mechanism" but with the keystroke that users typically use
"alt+left arrow".  The back option and history are typically present in the
menu bars of browsers and should take the user back to the prior HTML page -
although this is a point of confusion for many users.

 

Jonathan

 

From: harry.loots@googlemail.com [mailto:harry.loots@googlemail.com] On
Behalf Of Harry Loots
Sent: Friday, November 16, 2012 12:12 PM
To: judy@accessibilityexperts.ca
Cc: WAI Group
Subject: Re: Links and target frames

 

Hi Judy
it is not clear to me whether the user will be are clicking on a link in a
web page (HTML) / or in a Word document?


Kind regards, Harry

On 16 November 2012 17:55, Judy Gregg <judy@accessibilityexperts.ca> wrote:

Wondering if I could get your feedback on what is the most accessible choice
of target frame for a link to open once it is clicked on.

 

There has been different opinions that I have heard. What I keep hearing is
that if you choose none or default it is the most accessible. Yet some
people have also said that sometimes when this option is selected that they
sometimes get stuck and cannot go back to where they originally were on a
webpage. For example, they are browsing a webpage and there is a link to a
document, they select the document and it replaces the webpage they were on.
There is not an option to go back to the original webpage they were on and
the back button does not take them back to the original webpage. 

 

If the document they were selecting opened in a new window, they would be
able to close or minimize the document and still be able to go back to the
original webpage they were viewing.

 

If a person was browsing the web using a keyboard only, would having the
document open and replace the current webpage and not be able to go back to
the original webpage be considered to have a keyboard trap?

 

The screen capture below shows the various options from a website you can
choose when selecting a hyperlink which are none, same frame, whole page,
new window, parent frame.

 

Screen capture showing the options of how a page will be opened once a link
is selected within a webpage.

 

The screen capture below shows the various options from Word 2010 you can
choose when selecting a hyperlink which are page default (none), same frame,
whole page, new window, parent frame, none.

 

Screen capture showing the options of how a page will be opened once a link
is selected within Word 2010.

 

Another question is the screen tip for the links, in which situations would
this be useful? If a person is using a screen reader, would they have to
hear the description of the link and the screen tip?

 

Does the version of browser affect any of the choices in selecting the
target frame?

 

Your suggestion or feedback would be appreciated.

 

Judy

 





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Received on Monday, 19 November 2012 16:45:27 GMT

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