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Re: accessible images (diagrams)

From: ejp10 <ejp10@psu.edu>
Date: Wed, 31 Mar 2010 11:21:02 -0400
Message-Id: <522EEFB9-F69A-44BB-9048-AF71838E9425@psu.edu>
To: Régis Diniz <regisdiniz@gmail.com>, w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
I agree with David Woolley that you should recreate it. There are diagramming programs that can convert a flow cart or hierarchical diagram to an outline, but to be honest I don't know where the diagram begins. 

If you have explanatory text around the diagram you can refer users to that IN SOME CASES. You would have fill in any gaps your explanation leaves out.

If you are relying just on the image to be explanatory, then you might have to point visually impaired to a long text description which explains all the links (e.g. Character branches off to Type, ExpPoints, Level.... and you have to explain what the oval means).

Here are some real world examples and the solutions we used,although multiple strategies are possible.
http://blogs.tlt.psu.edu/projects/accessibilitydemo/examples/imagealttag.html
http://blogs.tlt.psu.edu/projects/accessibilitydemo/examples/proofstacks.html

Elizabeth

P.S. FWIW I think that a more usable diagram visually is easier to accessify for the visually impaired.

On Mar 31, 2010, at 9:58 AM, Régis Diniz wrote:

> Hi,
> 
> Here in Brazil we have a group trying to implement image accessibility for some blind students.
> 
> The idea is that diagrams like this: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/72/ER_Diagram_MMORPG.png must be accessible to them.
> 
> We've been searching over the internet for solutions like a software that would convert the image into tactile graphics or something like this but it seems like there's not much information available. A sound version of the graphic would solve the problem, but it's far nonpratical.
> 
> Could anyone help us with some advices?
> 
> Thanks in advance,
> 
> Régis
> 
> 

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
Elizabeth J. Pyatt, Ph.D.
Instructional Designer
Education Technology Services, TLT/ITS
Penn State University
ejp10@psu.edu, (814) 865-0805 or (814) 865-2030 (Main Office)

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Received on Wednesday, 31 March 2010 15:21:31 GMT

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