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RE: Success Criterion 2.4.7. Focus Order

From: Morten Tollefsen <morten@medialt.no>
Date: Fri, 1 May 2009 00:03:41 +0200
Message-ID: <EDA91A2F291B104FA26F01B9300235E42AF13F@mlt-server-01.medialt.local>
To: "Phill Jenkins" <pjenkins@us.ibm.com>, "WAI Interest Group" <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Hi, Phill!

 

> My data shows that users (seniors, novice, and about 80% of all others) have no idea why the link is there and when 

> sked, expect it to do something else, such as skip to some other page in the web site.  When they do click on it they 

> on't even realize that it only moved the focus to a different spot. 

 

These results are probably correct - at least what you are writing sounds reasonable!

 

My question is why users (80 % of all others) are confused. Is it because:

1. Skip to links have been hidden (and still are) on most pages. Therefore several users do not know this functionallity.

2. These links should be hidden because the functionality is confusing?

 

If 1 is correct I think it is a good idea not to hide the links. The reason is that nothing dangerous happens when selecting a standard skip to link. Persons (at least without cognitive disabilities) will relatively soon learn what all this is about.

 

If 2 is the explanation, this is more tricky. Then skip to links is confusing in its nature and should probably be hidden (or avoided). My guess is that if persons are not able to learn this, they will have really great problems with most modern sites.

 

Profiles

Well, profiles are probably also confusing and difficult for several users. Could work on an intranet or on special sites, but it is more difficult on larger sites. At least more difficult to let an average user select the most suitable options. There is no standards (at least not commonly used) for profiles like this: therefore the user eventually have to learn different things for each site. If possible: keep it simple and try to minimize the need for spesific configurations. But of course: sites are so different that no rules with out exceptions. I've just done this on a SharePoint Intranet:-).

 

 

Best regards,

 

Morten Tollefsen

MediaLT: www.medialt.no

Phone: (+47) 21 53 80 10

Mobile: (+47) 908 99 305

Address: Jerikoveien 22, N-1067 Oslo, Norway

 

 

 

 

Fra: w3c-wai-ig-request@w3.org [mailto:w3c-wai-ig-request@w3.org] På vegne av Phill Jenkins
Sendt: 30. april 2009 18:00
Til: WAI Interest Group
Emne: Re: Success Criterion 2.4.7. Focus Order

 


> making the link visible does no har to usability 

David, 
do you have any data or studies to back up your assertion? 

My data shows that users (seniors, novice, and about 80% of all others) have no idea why the link is there and when asked, expect it to do something else, such as skip to some other page in the web site.  When they do click on it they don't even realize that it only moved the focus to a different spot. 

Regards,
Phill Jenkins, 
Received on Thursday, 30 April 2009 22:04:26 GMT

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