W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > w3c-wai-ig@w3.org > January to March 2004

Re: Skip Sections

From: Andrew Kirkpatrick <andrew_kirkpatrick@wgbh.org>
Date: Mon, 29 Mar 2004 10:58:01 -0500
To: w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
Message-id: <BC8DB1B9.27AAC%andrew_kirkpatrick@wgbh.org>

Alternatively, you could have kept the main story together and made the
"standards" and "commerce" stories occur after the main story in the HTML
but use CSS to position them.  This would avoid the need for the skip link
and header navigation would work well.

AWK


On 3/29/04 10:24 AM, "Nick Kew" <nick@webthing.com> wrote:

> 
> 
> It seems to me that a list of links is not the only thing that risks
> interrupting the narrative of a page for linear renditions such as speech.
> 
> I sometimes write a page designed to render in multiple columns for
> majority visible browsers.  Schematically, things like
> 
> <h2>Main Story</h2>
> <p>here is a first paragraph at the top</p>
> 
> <div class="right-inset-30%">
> <h3>Some subsidiary story</h3>
> <p>bla bla bla</p>
> </div>
> 
> <p>This continues the main story, flowing around the inset.</p>
> 
> 
> This works well in graphical browsers, but breaks the story for
> linear browsers.  The alternative of keeping the main story together
> loses the ability to float-and-flow for the majority readers.
> Also "headers navigation" does nothing for it, because there's
> logically no header to mark the continuation.
> 
> 
> I think perhaps we need to view this kind of situation as a
> generalisation of "skip links", and provide a similar kind of
> workaround.  I have used the following, and wonder if it is
> satisfactory in all realistic cases:
> 
> (1) Use the above schematic for the benefit of visual browsers:
> (2) Add a "Continue this story" link and a "Main story continued"
>   target before and after the insets respectively.
> (3) Style the "continue" anchors as "display: none"
> 
> The URL in my .sig is a case in point.
Received on Monday, 29 March 2004 10:59:50 UTC

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.3.1 : Wednesday, 5 February 2014 07:13:32 UTC