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Joe wrote: "There is no plan of action available to you in order to accommodate learning-disabled visitors"

From: Jonathan Chetwynd <j.chetwynd@btinternet.com>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2004 01:02:00 +0000
Cc: WAI-IG <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>, dave@mezzoblue.com
To: Joe Clark <joeclark@joeclark.org>
Message-Id: <6B0249A4-4BAD-11D8-AAEB-0003939B5AD0@btinternet.com>

Joe,

which experts did you consult before writing the piece on learning 
disabilities for your book:  Building Accessible Websites?

you might like to contrast:
"There is no plan of action available to you in order to accommodate 
learning-disabled visitors"

with this from TechDis:
Good web design with an awareness of usability will help everyone and 
in particular use of clear and concise language with easy to understand 
graphical navigational cues will help those with cognitive 
difficulties. This may include memory difficulties so it is essential 
that all elements are obvious and follow the usual patterns for use of 
the web.

Trying to surf a web page in an unknown language soon highlights some 
of the difficulties that can arise. Many people will be assisted by the 
introduction of meaningful graphics (with alt tags for the blind), if 
they are necessary to the content, and are used with a judicious amount 
of white space so that pages do not appear cluttered or confusing.

---

There are a range of resources on enabling people with learning 
difficulties to enjoy the web, linked from here:
http://www.learningdifferently.com/develop/papers.html  most are by 
experts, but yours is the only one with such a depressing conclusion.

thanks

Jonathan Chetwynd
http://www.peepo.co.uk
"It's easy to use"
Received on Tuesday, 20 January 2004 19:55:48 UTC

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