W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > w3c-wai-ig@w3.org > January to March 2002

Re: Help Unsubscribing

From: Al Gilman <asgilman@iamdigex.net>
Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2002 22:12:23 -0500
Message-Id: <200201150312.WAA4503399@smtp1.mail.iamworld.net>
To: "Brigan, Kell" <kbrigan@water.ca.gov>, <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
At 10:55 AM 2002-01-14 , Brigan, Kell wrote:
>Can anyone help me unsubscribe from this list? (Nothing personal; just too
much traffic. I wouldn't bug the list with this, except that I really need to
cut the traffic in my In box.)
>
>I tried sending an "unsubscribe" message to "w3c-wai-ig-request@w3.org", but
this apparently didn't work, and it looks like I inadvertently zapped the intro
message.
>

I bet you put the 'unsubscribe' in the body of the message.  This particular
list manager takes commands in the message Subject: line.

I am surprised that if your attempt didn't meet with the expectations of the
list processor that you didn't get back an informational message containing
sufficient instructions to get you off the list.  Or did you write a subject
line starting with 'Re:' ?  Messages with reply subject lines get sidetracked
for human review.  That's catch #17.

Anyhow, for everyone's reference, there is a discussion of the unsubscribe
magic words at

<http://www.w3.org/WAI/IG/#Uselist>http://www.w3.org/WAI/IG/#Uselist

I guess it did take me four clicks to get there after starting at /WAI/.

copied below is the reply I got from w3c-wai-ig-request@w3.org when I sent
(just now) an intentionally malformed admin request, so as to trigger the error
recovery response.

This is actually the most universal gesture for list processors.  If you can
manage to figure out the administrative mail address, send a known bad command
message and it should send back the help page, or at least a message containing
instructions as to how to get the help page, and you are on your way to fame
and fortune.

Al
--

Date: Mon, 14 Jan 2002 21:55:08 -0500 (EST)
From: w3c-wai-ig-request@w3.org
Message-Id: <200201150255.VAA00552@www19.w3.org>
To: asgilman@iamdigex.net
Subject: Re: let's see what this brings
References: <200201150255.VAA3945249@smtp2.mail.iamworld.net>
In-Reply-To: <200201150255.VAA3945249@smtp2.mail.iamworld.net>
X-Loop: w3c-wai-ig@w3.org

******* About the W3C Mailing Lists *******

There are many mailing lists provided by the W3C for discussion
and development on the World Wide Web. A full list of them
is available at:

   <http://www.w3.org/Mail/Lists>http://www.w3.org/Mail/Lists

NOTE that this list is not the place for any of the following:

   How do I configure [insert-favorite-software-here]?
   I'm new to the web -- what is it?
   I tried to ask [insert-company-here] customer support, but
        [I didn't get any response / they told me to RTFM]

Answers to the above are often found in the WWW FAQ maintained
by Thomas Boutell.  The FAQ is available from:

   <http://www.boutell.com/faq/>http://www.boutell.com/faq/

The FAQ also lists the names of all the USENET newsgroups that are
available regarding the WWW (most under the
comp.infosystems.<http://www.*/>www.*
hierarchy.)

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The -request mail address should be used for all list administrative
requests.  It accepts the following commands (in the Subject of an
e-mail message):

    subscribe         -- Subscribe to the list.  If you want to subscribe
                         under a different address, use a Reply-To: address
                         header in the message.

    unsubscribe       -- Unsubscribe from the list.

    help              -- Get information about the mailing list.

In the event of an address change, it would probably be wisest to first
send an unsubscribe for the old address (this can be done from the new
address), and then a new subscribe from the new address (the order is
important.)

Most (un)subscription requests are processed automatically without human
intervention.  Do not send multiple (un)subscription or info requests in
one mail.  Only one will be processed per mail.

NOTE: The -request server usually does quite a good job in discriminating
      between (un)subscribe requests and messages intended for the
      maintainer.  If you'd like to make sure a human reads your message,
      make it look like a reply (i.e. the first word in the Subject: field
      should be "Re:", without the quotes of course); the -request server
      does not react to replies.

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=================================================================

>Thanks.
>  
Received on Monday, 14 January 2002 22:12:37 GMT

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