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Re: Fw: a good example of JAWS forms input

From: Al Gilman <asgilman@iamdigex.net>
Date: Sun, 12 Aug 2001 13:11:29 -0400
Message-Id: <200108121654.MAA5111982@smtp2.mail.iamworld.net>
To: "Susan M. Johns" <suzyq@mail.pittstate.edu>
Cc: "wai-ig list" <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>

Susan,

1.  Examples of accessible forms.

Look at the search form rewrites at 

Speech-Friendly Search Engine Query Submission Forms
 <<http://www.hicom.net/~oedipus/search.html>http://www.hicom.net/~oedipus/
search.html>

HomeRuns was another example, but I fear it's gone.

These are specifically targeted to be usable with screen readers and speech.

2.  "Reasonably complex form."

This can indeed be a challenge.  You should find ways to get out of the box
and
do "is this trip necessary?" challenge to the complexity.

One way to do this is to visit TellMe and/or BeVocal -- voice portals as near
as your phone -- and think about the structure and flow of a voice dialog that
would transact the trasaction you wish to offer.

The techy way to proceed from there is to design a card set using the methods
of X-Forms.

The legacy friendly way is to put in low-tech navaids that get you to each
form
you might want to use in isolation from the others, and orientation aids that
explain what is there when you get there.

Be sure there is an explicit submit button for the user to find and activate.

Find some way to orient the user on entry to each form, explaining the extent
of the form and whether there are more [optional] controls in this same form
after the first occurrence of a submit button.  This is the most common thing
that visual designers don't realize isn't obvious when entering a form
linearly
in speech.

HTH

Al

And yes, as David said, you want your pages to work with a range of screen
readers.

In Pittsburgh you have the Carnegie Library which has had accessible offerings
for a long time and contacts with consumer groups.  You might want to network
with them to determine how to get your results checked with more than one
browser and screen reader.

At 10:35 AM 2001-08-12 , David Poehlman wrote:
>no jaws please?
>
>----- Original Message -----
>From: "Susan M. Johns" <suzyq@mail.pittstate.edu>
>To: <access-l@icomm.ca>
>Sent: Saturday, August 11, 2001 8:35 PM
>Subject: a good example of JAWS forms input
>
>
>Does anyone have a site on the web that they would consider to be a
>somewhat
>complex form that is easily understood/input using JAWS?
>
>I've been experimenting and find that tabbing through the forms gives
>some
>really weird results, especially when you try to fill in the forms with
>data, advance to the next field, and actually submit or execute the
>form.  I
>don't think the problem is JAWS, but I'm wondering if someone could
>point me
>to a site that JAWS can execute well with the nagivational aids it has.
>I'd
>like to design some local library forms here that require user input,
>such
>as an ILL request form or simple email query for information, but I'm
>stumped.
>
>Any advice?  I really don't want to steal anyone's source  :_), but I
>could
>use some good examples of what works to try to replicate.  I'm just not
>getting
>it, I guess, in xhtml.  Thanks for any help anyone can give,
>
>
>Susan Johns
>Systems/Circulation Librarian            Voice:  (620) 235-4115
>Axe Library, Pittsburg State University  Fax:    (620) 235-4090
>Pittsburg KS  66762
>suzyq@mail.pittstate.edu
><http://library.pittstate.edu/staff/susan>http://library.pittstate.edu/sta
ff/susan
>  
Received on Sunday, 12 August 2001 12:54:16 GMT

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